Depositing at Videoslots again, because at least it works

Was my friend who hadthe Amiga. PD game I believe yeah, i forgot that term, PD, it's been so long lol. We would skip school, probably 11 years old, playig schorced pants. That's what we called it. Ithad a weapo called Crimson Flood, which woud flood an area then leave them buried miles beneath it once it had finished. Was better tha worms imo.

My friend was making games othe Amiga at the time, only 11 or 12 years old. He ripped off bubble bobble but used an ass and a head to burp and fart as the characters. Had a unique sense of humour :D

Was more of an Atari ST man myself ;)

The problem I had with the ZX Spectrum and the Atari ST was their feeble sound compared to their main rivals, the Commodore 64 and Amiga respectively. I know that as Brits we're supposed to root for dear old Clive's plucky UK contender, but once I first heard the dulcet tones of the C64's SID chip I was a convert, and decamped from my Spectrum to the C64, although I kept my Spectrum 128 around too.

When the 16-bit computers first started becoming sort of affordable (albeit well out of reach of our household), I remember being shown an Atari ST round at a friend of a friend's, and whilst I was impressed by the graphics, the first thing that jumped out at me was the fact the music was worse than my on my C64! (Atari having used a pretty shit sound chip in the ST, of course.)

Then a good friend of mine got an Amiga A500 (I was still on my C64, the expense of an Amiga was pie in the sky to me as a teenager, we're talking 1988/1989 at this point), and I was utterly blown way by it, the graphics were as good or better as the Atari ST, but the sound and music the thing was capable of kicking out, just incredible. We spent hours and hours playing on his Amiga together, quite often just watching demos and cracktro screens, to enjoy the music and special graphical trickery the Amiga's custom graphics chips could produce.

This is one I very clearly remember us being transfixed by, this was released in 1988, no other computer in the world could knock music like this out using just its own internal sound hardware (unfortunately the little pulsating bars at the top of the screen get out of sync with the audio, which I suspect is because it's being run through an emulator rather than on actual hardware):

 
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Award winning Videoslots is reviewed by Casinomeister
The problem I had with the ZX Spectrum and the Atari ST was their feeble sound compared to their main rivals, the Commodore 64 and Amiga respectively. I know that as Brits we're supposed to root for dear old Clive's plucky UK contender, but once I first heard the dulcet tones of the C64's SID chip I was a convert, and decamped from my Spectrum to the C64, although I kept my Spectrum 128 around too.

When the 16-bit computers first started becoming sort of affordable (albeit well out of reach of our household), I remember being shown an Atari ST round at a friend of a friend's, and whilst I was impressed by the graphics, the first thing that jumped out at me was the fact the music was worse than my on my C64! (Atari having used a pretty shit sound chip in the ST, of course.)

Then a good friend of mine got an Amiga A500 (I was still on my C64, the expense of an Amiga was pie in the sky to me as a teenager, we're talking 1988/1989 at this point), and I was utterly blown way by it, the graphics were as good or better as the Atari ST, but the sound and music the thing was capable of kicking out, just incredible. We spent hours and hours playing on his Amiga together, quite often just watching demos and cracktro screens, to enjoy the music and special graphical trickery the Amiga's custom graphics chips could produce.

This is one I very clearly remember us being transfixed by, this was released in 1988, no other computer in the world could knock music like this out using just its own internal sound hardware (unfortunately the little pulsating bars at the top of the screen get out of sync with the audio, which I suspect is because it's being run through an emulator rather than on actual hardware):


Not true at all -

yes, the Amiga had better graphics compared to the ST, but the latter was renowned for its sound hardware capabilities, offering MIDI support favoured by music producers. In fact, I remember hawking mine to a sound engineer, and we're talking late '90s, I'd imagine the ST still gets utilized for this very reason today if anything :cool:

C64's sound chipset was a cut above, its 3-channelled capabilities allowing the likes of Rob Hubbard to wrangle legendary sweeping scores from its hardware, of that there is no doubt!

Yet for 16-bit home computing, prior to the advent of the consoles' foray into the market, the Amiga was definitely a beast, especially graphically. Oh how I lamented not being able to play the likes of Monkey Island; cry at the cartoony greatness of North & South, or simply the acceptance that when perusing game boxes, that my C64 conversions would be laughably inferior to the arcade-perfect recreations of the Amigas and STs of this world :D
 
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Not true at all -

yes, the Amiga had better graphics compared to the ST, but the latter was renowned for its sound hardware capabilities, offering MIDI support favoured by music producers. In fact, I remember hawking mine to a sound engineer, and we're talking late '90s, I'd imagine the ST still gets utilized for this very reason today if anything :cool:

C64's sound chipset was a cut above, it's 3-channelled capabilities allowing the likes of Rob Hubbard to wrangle legendary sweeping scores from its hardware, of that there is no doubt!

Yet for 16-bit home computing, prior to the advent of the consoles' foray into the market, the Amiga was definitely a beast, especially graphically. Oh how I lamented not being able to play the likes of Monkey Island; cry at the cartoony greatness of North & South, or simply the acceptance that when perusing game boxes, that my C64 conversions would be laughably inferior to the arcade-perfect recreations of the Amigas and STs of this world :D

Woah Mr Goaty! I'm afraid I'm going to have to escalate things immediately to DEFCON NERD LEVEL 5 - I explicitly used the following phrase in my previous post for precisely this reason:

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this was released in 1988, no other computer in the world could knock music like this out using just its own internal sound hardware

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The ST's MIDI capabilities were (and still are!) legendary, but of little use to spotty teenaged oiks who were doing very well to even own a 16-bit computer, let alone the extravagant extra hardware that made the ST a music creation powerhouse for many years (decades!).

The ST's built-in sound chip was notoriously weak (and indeed was actually closely related to the sound chip used by the Spectrum 128 and Amstrad CPC), basically a cheap off the shelf part that was already long in the tooth when the ST was released -
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The Amiga on the other hand used a custom chipset designed specifically for the computer, with full digital and stereo audio capabilities, there's just no comparison, it absolutely knocked the AY chip in the ST into the proverbial cocked hat.

I agree completely that when combined with the appropriate MIDI hardware, the ST was an unparalleled machine for music creation (far more so than the Amiga), especially so given its price point and therefore accessibility, but all by itself, when relying just on its own hardware, its sound and music were some very weak sauce - and that's the use case I referenced, in my previous post. (i.e. Games, demos, crack screens etc.)

IN THE BLUE CORNER, the Atari ST version of Psygnosis' Obliterator, using its own internal sound hardware.



IN THE RED CORNER, the Amiga version of Psygnosis' Obliterator, using its own internal sound hardware.

 
Can I gain some gaming kudos for completing Abe's Odyssey, Abe's Exodus, South Park, some pirate one where you were a skeleton and Tomb Raider 1 (NO save gems!) on the PS1? Plus some good high scores on the arcade classics PS1 game with Missile Command and Asteroids etc. on it? Then 3 more Tomb Raiders on the PS2? Do I get in the club or is my pedigree lacking? I did play Pong as a kid back in 1977 too!
 
Can I gain some gaming kudos for completing Abe's Odyssey, Abe's Exodus, South Park, some pirate one where you were a skeleton and Tomb Raider 1 (NO save gems!) on the PS1? Plus some good high scores on the arcade classics PS1 game with Missile Command and Asteroids etc. on it? Then 3 more Tomb Raiders on the PS2? Do I get in the club or is my pedigree lacking? I did play Pong as a kid back in 1977 too!
You're alright - the PS1 was revolutionary in itself, with the 'Golden Age' being not long after in the form of the 128-bit era.

Post- Playstation 2 gaming is not a patch on what went before, and you're not missing anything, bar the odd sleeper hit or indie title.

Good to see you liked the Abe games, I think our jaws hit the floor when seeing the animations on that back in the day ?
 
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Had a bag of copied games too Chop, slapped on my lap when I was probably 9 years old. I'd already seen the girl show her butt at the end of Double Dragon 450 times in the arcade, but with 500 games at Christmas to play, after some careful consideration, I spent the day playing Double Dragon.
Was serial link'ing the amiga's on the pre Doom FPS games, was something like 5 fps framerate iirc lol. Such great times were to be had in the 90s :D
 
Award winning Videoslots is reviewed by Casinomeister

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