Entire Ladbrokes customer database for sale

thelawnet

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The confidential records of millions of British gamblers who bet with top bookmaker Ladbrokes have been offered for sale to The Mail on Sunday.
The huge data theft is now at the centre of a criminal investigation after this newspaper was given the personal information of 10,000 Ladbrokes customers and offered access to its database of 4.5 million people in the UK and abroad.
Last night we alerted Ladbrokes to the damaging security breach and handed the customer files to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), Britain's data watchdog, which immediately began to investigate.
The records include customers' home addresses, details of their gambling history, customer account numbers, dates of birth, phone numbers and email addresses.
The database was offered for sale by a mysterious Australian. He claimed to be a computer security expert who had worked at Ladbrokes in Britain.
During protracted negotiations via email and in one phone call, the man, who gave his name only as 'Daniel', claimed to represent a company based in Melbourne, Australia.
The company, DSS Enterprises, is run by Dinitha Subasinghe, a Sri Lankan-born IT expert.
Last night, Mr Subasinghe denied any involvement in the data theft. He designs websites and also runs a wedding planning business with his British-born girlfriend Charlene King.
Australia's companies house describes Mr Subasinghe as a 'sole trader'. His recent work has involved designing websites for estate agents in Melbourne, but he also lists Ladbrokes and the UK Ministry of Defence as clients.
 

Wildfire7

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The confidential records of millions of British gamblers who bet with top bookmaker Ladbrokes have been offered for sale to The Mail on Sunday.
The huge data theft is now at the centre of a criminal investigation after this newspaper was given the personal information of 10,000 Ladbrokes customers and offered access to its database of 4.5 million people in the UK and abroad.
Last night we alerted Ladbrokes to the damaging security breach and handed the customer files to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), Britain's data watchdog, which immediately began to investigate.
The records include customers' home addresses, details of their gambling history, customer account numbers, dates of birth, phone numbers and email addresses.
The database was offered for sale by a mysterious Australian. He claimed to be a computer security expert who had worked at Ladbrokes in Britain.
During protracted negotiations via email and in one phone call, the man, who gave his name only as 'Daniel', claimed to represent a company based in Melbourne, Australia.
The company, DSS Enterprises, is run by Dinitha Subasinghe, a Sri Lankan-born IT expert.
Last night, Mr Subasinghe denied any involvement in the data theft. He designs websites and also runs a wedding planning business with his British-born girlfriend Charlene King.
Australia's companies house describes Mr Subasinghe as a 'sole trader'. His recent work has involved designing websites for estate agents in Melbourne, but he also lists Ladbrokes and the UK Ministry of Defence as clients.
In responce to this, Ladbrokes have issued the following statement:

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LADBROKES are contacting punters to reassure them their credit card details, passwords, and other financial details are safe after confidential records of millions of gamblers who bet with the bookmaker were offered for sale to a national newspaper.

Ciaran O'Brien, head of PR at Ladbrokes, said: "We have been informed that a person connected to our organisation has offered certain details from a customer database to the Mail on Sunday.

"This is a criminal act and we are working with the police, the ICO and the newspaper to identify and apprehend the culprit.

"We are in the process of contacting customers to apologise for this breach in security and to reassure them that everything is being done to protect their personal information.

"Importantly this does not effect customer passwords or banking data."
How this reassures customers everything is being done I am not sure. Surely its a case of bolting the stable doors after the horse has bolted.

In the wrong hands the information held on this database could be lethal, leading the way to all kinds of fraudulent activities.

Mike
 

Mousey

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Sep 12, 2004
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Up$hitCreek
"Importantly this does not effect customer passwords or banking data."
... and they're certain of this??
 

itsblitz

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Joined
Jan 23, 2010
Location
uk
this is why i never deposit or withdraw from my cards, always moneybookers or ukash for me..
"and iv just read the post properly and see that they dont have passwords or banking records so that makes that statement irrelevant"
 
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WagerWitch

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webmeister
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Oct 16, 2003
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Alaska
Just wondering was this the same dude that tried to come through here to post the same stuff?
 

Rhyzz

Full Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2008
Location
United Kingdom
The Important financial information isn't stored so peoples card details etc will be perfectly safe. It's the whole 'which famous people are gambling' aspect which is the profitable part. Only 10,000 records shown to them? Guarantee it's the top 10,000 in the database which will undoubtedly include footballers and their net cash position/debts with the company.

Massive breach of data protection and I hope this 'Daniel' person get's locked up for a long time. Idiots like him do serious damage to the trust these online companies are trying tirelesly to build and keep the government off their backs.
 

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