ISPs Blocking Gambling Related sites in the USA

Casinomeister

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Here's a wake up call to everyone regardless of your relationship to this industry (player, aff.,operator, etc.) or where you live.

There may be evidence that the US is planning to block all gaming related sites from being accessed by anyone from the land of Freedom - the good ol' USA.

It was reported at CAP (Casinoaffiliateprograms.com) that this has happened to customers of Adelphia and Comcast.

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I'm not trying to prod anyone's paranoia, but it is plausible that ISPs are prepping to block anything gambling related - to include Neteller - to include this site (OMG), in anticipation of online gaming becoming "illegal" in the states.

If anyone has been experiencing these sort of blockages - please let us know. This could turn into a very serious thing. US citizens rights are being squashed.

Any ideas on how to deal with this? I'm all ears.
 

Cynthia777

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I have Comcast broadband internet service, and I haven't had any problems (so far, and luckily). Hopefully this is just "word of mouth", or something that has gotten misconstrued. I really hope that this would never happen, and honestly believe that there would be much debate, proposals in legislation, and time delays before this would be implicated.

Suffice to say I have not seen/read anything relating to ISPs/blocking specifically. I am a Federal employee of the U.S. Government on Capitol Hill, and work at the U.S. Government Printing Office where we handle documents, including bills/proposals from Congress. Generally speaking, I personally have not come across anything specifically relating to the issue of ISPs and web-blocking.

I vastly enjoy playing at online casinos, and know that one has to be careful to check the accreditations, reputation, and policies of a casino before playing. My personal hope is that emphasis would be placed moreso on the licensing and regulations/security, rather than putting a stop to online gaming PERIOD.

Nonetheless, time is key - debate, approvals, proposals, and the like all take time, and always have to potential to be ongoing, ongoing, ongoing.. so I doubt anything like this would be so "instant"
 

sdaddy

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Arizona
Thanks for the heads up Bryan.

I'm an Adelphia customer in PA, but haven't had any problems with such blockages. I'd switch ISPs right away if they did try this.

Cynthia777 said:
Nonetheless, time is key - debate, approvals, proposals, and the like all take time, and always have to potential to be ongoing, ongoing, ongoing.. so I doubt anything like this would be so "instant"
True, but this could happen in a similar way as what the US banks did with blocking CC transactions. In anticipation of legislation from Congress, the ISPs could take their own restrictive actions, and it could be very quick.

Keep us posted on anything happening in Congress though. It's nice to have someone here with your type of knowledge and access.
 

Cynthia777

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sure will (as much as I can, that isn't considered "privileged information", closed session, etc.) Just had to throw that in there .. in case any of my peers, management should see :p

And it is highly ironic, that I, of all people there, received the Goodlatte proposal a week or so ago to work on...(I turned to my co-worker next to me and said .. "geez, they don't want us to have ANY fun!" The people in my department know I LOVE to gamble, whether it be online, at casinos, racetrack/telephone betting (TVG/Expressbet)-(I used to call in my bets when I worked dayshift riding the MARC train into work since I couldn't go to the track!)

It will be very interesting to see the developments concerning this issue.. of course, at least Congress does have MUCH to be busy with aside from the online gaming issue, so this would probably be a factor in the time anything would take to be implemented (my opinion)
 

Westland Bowl

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Last year, didn't some Rothschild family sold their poker website or something? Perhaps they knew what was/is coming down the pike and got out before their net worth went down over fears of a ban. You know the Rothschilds are famous for their poker faces (pun intended).
 

managra

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Btw, i wanted to point out that this is not just an American problem! If this proposed legislation were to pass or if ISPs in anticipation start blocking Neteller and gambling sites, it will have repercussions on everybody. The US is the biggest market and if that market were to fall away, lots of sites and casinos would disappear.

I do hope therefore that if CM decides on some action in which forum members can join that the non US members will pitch in as well.
 

managra

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sdaddy said:
Thanks for the heads up Bryan.

I'm an Adelphia customer in PA, but haven't had any problems with such blockages. I'd switch ISPs right away if they did try this.

Why not email Adelphia and tell them that you would switch ISP immediately if they were to implement this blockage? And tell them that you would do so on principle not just because you gamble. If ISPs were to get a lot of emails from their customers they may think twice before doing something so drastic.

Also, i don't believe they will get many emails from non-gamblers saying that this is such a fantastic idea (although you never know about those fanatical nut cases at the far right). So, there's an opportunity for those who like to see their rights preserved to mass together and have some impact.
 

bb1webs

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while i think the battle will be long and hard, I don't think it will ever come to the point of having sites blocked by our ISPs because when that starts happening (in the states) it will be the virtual version of the gov. coming to our homes and demanding we give up our guns.

Ain't gonna happen peaceably. I will assure you of that.

Even many against OG will come to its side and all hell will be raised!

I would expect nearly any kind of lowball tactic coming from the US gov: but I don't think it is likely this would be one they'd get past the people.

Once you start down the slippery slope it is all too damn easy to end up at the bottom and though I don't credit the US people with a lot: (mostly due to their apothetic attitude)... I do credit them with being smart enough to see the possible future that allowing this sort of action could bring ...

which once they realize its something that will effect their own personal interests; they will rise and be heard with devasting effect. The US gov hasn't taken THAT much power away from the people. not yet and no time soon.

So I look for a number of failed angles for the gov to attempt but blocking sites isn't one of them. And I damn sure hope I'm right. :)
 

winbig

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damn, I read this and thought the title said China, not USA. This will never fly. Sure they can try, but they'll get their a$$ sued as soon as gamblers are affected that live in states where you can gamble online legally (98% of the USA, I'm sure).

There wouldn't be a lawyer in the USA that would turn down a class action suit such as this. They cannot legally block *legal* sites. It's a violation of our constitutional rights, until a time when they make it against the law.

Blocking online gambling would be similar to when they passed prohibition way back when.


It'd be interesting to know what kind of effect this would cause to the online gaming industry. Anyone know what % of players are from the USA?
 

dominique

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The Professor from CAP has asked me to post that he will comment here but can't login at the time. As soon as the login problem is fixed, he'll be here to comment.
 

BrianC

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Hold on a sec....I don't think this is true. ISP's tend to reject government
requests to "police" where customers are visiting unless there is a court
order to do so. As of now, there is no such court order and there is no
law stating that online gaming is even illegal. I doubt, very much, that ISP's
will just want to do this on their own. For what reason?
If they DID do this, then we'd need to be very suspicious of governement intervention, and maybe threats made to ISP's.

It is rediculous to think that with real things to worry about on the internet (such as child porn) that they'd rather block adults from what is typically nothing more then an entertainment pastime.
There are scarey times here in the US. Out freedoms are slowly eroding away.
"Political correctness" is deteriorating freedom of speech while the post-911 government is seeking more and more new ways to 'spy' on good citizens under the disguise of "protecting" us.
Frankly, I'm sick of it all. All I can do is pray that it doesn't get worse.


Brian :confused:
 

Cynthia777

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nevermind all the controversy about the Privacy Act, which is due to have a ruling soon... I don't have all the specifics, but I'm sure somehow it ties into the issue, or someone would find a way to tie it in...

but, like I mentioned about timing and delays (especially when it comes to gambling).. I live in Maryland, and there has been ongoing debate, proposals, turndowns for regular casino slots to be legalized in this State. Proposals after proposals, with amendments, has been presented and turn down time and time again as we watch our neighboring states flourish with casinos (Delaware, West Virginia, and most recently Pennsylvania). And, I've always wondered why, but Neteller is NOT available to Maryland residents (and this is a major inconvenience for me). I wonder if that decision was made by the State of Maryland??? hmmm....

Delaware's casinos and race tracks are regulated by their State lottery.. so you would think the State of MD would see this as a benefit to the state government if they did the same.. but as mentioned earlier, you do have those "far right" opponents of gambling getting into the mix
 

jetset

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I just can't see the US administration getting away with this...not without one helluva fight with their own citizenry because as has already been said ISP banning would set such a dangerous precedent impacting the freedom of the Internet.

Regarding a concerted campaign to petition against this sort of thing, there was a time when the industry as a whole (and I'm including players) mobilised every time a ban was proposed. There were links and publicity on numerous sites routing to a suggested letter to the Congressional representatives of the folks who didn't think banning online gaming was a great idea.

I haven't seen much of that sort of activity in more recent times - maybe we've all become a little complacent as a result of so many banning attempts failing.
 

dominique

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If such a thing would happen, players would be key.

Players are a huge, voting group. They certainly have the power to stop such a thing (if it were to happen).
 

Casinomeister

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dominique said:
The Professor from CAP has asked me to post that he will comment here but can't login at the time. As soon as the login problem is fixed, he'll be here to comment.
He's been sent a new password :D

jetset said:
I just can't see the US administration getting away with this...not without one helluva fight with their own citizenry because as has already been said ISP banning would set such a dangerous precedent impacting the freedom of the Internet.
But I can see ISPs prepping themselves for DOJ threats. The DOJ has been successful in its sword rattling which has caused advertisers million. If an anti-gaming bill passes, I could see them turn towards ISPs and say - "you're aiding and abetting an illegal activity." And watch the ISPs scramble for the anti-gaming filter switch.
 

managra

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Cynthia777 said:
Delaware's casinos and race tracks are regulated by their State lottery.. so you would think the State of MD would see this as a benefit to the state government if they did the same.. but as mentioned earlier, you do have those "far right" opponents of gambling getting into the mix
Not trying to veer off topic, on some issues the Gov't (Fed and States) is so entrenched that they don't want to consider the benefits of reversing their stance. Take the infamous War on Drugs. How much has it cost? Has it helped anything? Just think how much revenue the Gov't could bring in if it were to legalize and regulate soft drugs. Just think how many resources (law enforcement, justice system, jail space) this would free up to more vigorously deal with tougher crimes.

I am anxious to hear what the Professor has to say. It's interesting though that he reported that he was having access to the web except anything gambling related. His ISP told him that they were doing some "testing".

Thank you, Jetset, for giving a historical perspective on all campaigns that had been mobilized in the present (as a relative noob i wasn't aware of that). It's never all that great to be complacent but particularly so when you are confronted with a trend that is nibbling away more and more of your rights. And given the tough political situation the party who is proposing this online anti-gaming legislation finds itself in at present, perhaps it is the ideal time to start mobilizing again.
 

suzecat

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Hummmmmm, apparently AOL hasn't flipped the switch yet.

Two points:

First, banks/credit cards were blocked as a result of amended banking regulations. As an earlier poster mentioned, someone was able to squirm out of legitimate debt and it scared the hell out of 'em (banks).

Second, until (BIG UNTIL) such time as the Congress/Senate votes AND approves a bill making gambling illegal, ISPs are not going to ban gambling related sites. Sure, they might be investigating contingency plans as we debate these issues, but they are not going to implement anything until they are legally obligated to do so. That would be, at best, like shooting themselves in the foot.

Lest we forget the states that allow (even encourage) gambling in the US. In order for any gambling ban to take effect, years of rewriting the US Constitution would be in order. SO, relax.

And BeetleB, you ain't gettin' rid of us that easy -- so just get back to work :D
 

dominique

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largeeyes said:
What gets me is that will block gambling, but not child porn. This is getting to be one really odd country.
You can say that again!

I was just going to say something about the past time those people must be enjoying since they go after aunt Betty's online Bingo game and grandpa Gus' online poker game, but there are millions of porn sites of all descriptions, from harmless to totally disgusting and abusive to kids.

It certainly makes you wonder.
 

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