1. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies .This website or its third-party tools use cookies, which are necessary to its functioning and required to achieve the purposes illustrated in the cookie policy.Find out more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice
  3. Follow Casinomeister on Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Casinomeister.us US Residents Click here! |  Svenska Svenska | 
Dismiss Notice
REGISTER NOW!! Why? Because you can't do diddly squat without having been registered!

At the moment you have limited access to view most discussions: you can't make contact with thousands of fellow players, affiliates, casino reps, and all sorts of other riff-raff.

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join Casinomeister here!

Aristocrat face lawsuit alleging deceptive conduct (aussie land based )

Discussion in 'Slots Discussion' started by pinkfloyd, Sep 5, 2016.

    Sep 5, 2016
  1. pinkfloyd

    pinkfloyd Experienced Member

    Occupation:
    fisherman
    Location:
    aus
    not sure if this belongs in this thread but thought some might be interested?.
    i myself play the slots as entertainment and know it when i go in to play , and to be honest i just wish someone would sue the companies that splash "big mega win" on the screen when you win $8 bux betting $1 lol
    but im quite sure australian law has something in place for land based slots that a losing bet cant be rewarded with bells and whistles ( dont quote me on this )



    the story here

    Crown casino and a major poker machine manufacturer face being targeted in landmark legal action for allegedly providing machines to the public that are misleading and deceptive.
    Shonica Guy says playing the pokies took over her life.
    Law firm Maurice Blackburn, acting for recovering pokie addict Shonica Guy, is challenging the companies under Australian Consumer Law.
    Ms Guy, who played the pokies for 14 years, is not seeking financial compensation but a declaration that the machines are deceptive.
    "The machines are actually designed to take your money; as soon as I touched the machine I was hooked. There is a fine line between gambling and entertainment," she said.

    "I just want people to know that they are being conned."

    Dolphin Treasure has been analysed by researchers at Monash University, and the legal action will focus on the uneven spread of symbols needed to win across the five "reels" central to the game.

    The legal challenge will also look into all the design features, including what is claimed to be a system in which losses are disguised as wins through images and sounds.


    full story here
    You must register/login in order to see the link.
     

Share This Page