Stop IT!

rainmaker

I'm not a penguin
webmeister
CAG
.

There is a Norwegian campaign running these days were WWF is showing how animals are brutally hunted down and left do die after horns and other "collectibles" are cut of. Absolutely heartbreaking.

Last month WWF launched a new global Stop IT! campaign calling on governments everywhere to combat illegal wildlife trade and reduce demand for rhino horns, elephant ivory and tiger parts.

You can support WWF by going to
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and choose your country. There you can for example adopt a rhino, donate etc. Maybe something to think about the next time you have been lucky at a casino :)


Rhino.jpg


 
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chayton

aka LooHoo
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I remember reading an article in Time or one of those magazines and they talked about this stuff - the rhino horns are being cut off to be sold to make some kind of herbal medications or something. In the article they had photos of these dead rhinos, the poachers were just driving around with chainsaws sawing the front of their faces off, it's horrible. :(
 

skiny

Banned User - violation of <a href="http://www.cas
I remember reading an article in Time or one of those magazines and they talked about this stuff - the rhino horns are being cut off to be sold to make some kind of herbal medications or something. In the article they had photos of these dead rhinos, the poachers were just driving around with chainsaws sawing the front of their faces off, it's horrible. :(
The Chinese use it for aphrodisiacs and to reduce fever although how something could simultaneously lower the body's temperature while increasing sexual arousal isn't really clear. (To me, anyway.)

The use has diminished, I think... or hope.

Elephant poachers have been given the blame for the dramatic reduction in tusk length in the last hundred years or so. Apparently when you kill off all the elephants with the longest tusks the shorter tusked elephants are more likely to breed. Isn't evolution great? I wonder if the Rhino horn will suffer the same fate.
 

vinylweatherman

You type well loads
CAG
MM
The Chinese use it for aphrodisiacs and to reduce fever although how something could simultaneously lower the body's temperature while increasing sexual arousal isn't really clear. (To me, anyway.)

The use has diminished, I think... or hope.

Elephant poachers have been given the blame for the dramatic reduction in tusk length in the last hundred years or so. Apparently when you kill off all the elephants with the longest tusks the shorter tusked elephants are more likely to breed. Isn't evolution great? I wonder if the Rhino horn will suffer the same fate.

It is fantastic. Eventually, the only elephants left will have tusks too short to bother with, and the trade will die out. Rhinos can live without horns, and many sanctuaries now remove the horns from their Rhino so that they are of no interest to poachers, and thus more likely to survive.

Killing off demand is the problem, as with drugs, reducing supply just drives the price up, and makes it more worthwhile for poachers to take the risk. Demand can only stop when the supply of Rhino or Elephant runs out, unless something is done that has so far not been thought of.

Ivory is stockpiled, not destroyed, and this has lead to calls for a legitimate ivory trade to be started up to use these stockpiles to produce a supply of legitimised ivory, and of course MAKE MONEY from what is a highly valuable material just gathering dust in some warehouse. New legitimate ivory will only stimulate demand again, and introduce new collectors to the lure of ivory. They are still going to want it when this supply runs out, and it will again be bought from the poachers. Drugs get destroyed when confiscated, yet even this does little to limit demand.

Whilst there are people who believe the "quacks" who tell them things like rhino horn can cure many ailments, for a price, there are people who will buy it for their health. Those who sell it probably know the whole thing is a scam, but they make money perpetuating the belief that it works.

There is a silver bullet that can put a stop to all of this, all that needs to be done is make enough of them, load them into enough rifles, and aim them at the poachers when they are at work. This IS a real threat to poachers, but they know the gamekeepers can barely afford fuel for their vehicles, let alone rifles and ammo, so the risk of being caught is pretty low, even though the policy in many places is to shoot at them and ask questions later.
 

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