Bet-at-home Advert Banned By U.k. Advertising Watchdog

Pantie copy adjudged to link gambling to sex

A mildly naughty advert placed by an affiliate for online gambling operator Bet-at-Home has been banned by the UK Advertising Standards Authority on grounds that it linked gambling and sex.
The advert featured a picture of a woman pulling her trousers down, exposing her panties inscribed with the words "if you can read this it's your lucky day" and linking to a promotion on a European football match involving Liverpool.
The marketing publication Campaign Live reports that a tweet by BetPromotions4U triggered the process, with the ASA itself questioning the acceptability of the material.
Bet-at-Home responded to ASA enquiries by claiming that the tweet was by a Croatia-based affiliate, Goran Pantic, and that their affiliate agreements included abiding by the ASA CAP code. They said the creative "it's your lucky day" was meant to be used in Malta.
Pantic, who later deleted the tweet, said the geo-targeting of the bet-at-home.com web site meant it was not possible to avoid UK consumers who clicked on the link going through to the company's UK site.
In its ruling the ASA said: "We considered that including the image of a woman pulling her trousers down and the text on her underwear stating "If you can read this it's your lucky day" linked gambling with sexual success. We therefore concluded that the ad breached the Code."
In related news, Ken Robertson – the newly promoted marketing chief for the merged Paddy Power-Betfair group, also had his hands full answering an ASA enquiry, although in his case the ruling went in the company's favour.
Robertson, a veteran well-versed in the Paddy Power 'mischievous marketing' ethos, had to handle questions regarding the suitability of an outdoor poster advert which made fun of Liverpool FC's high player injury in training list and featured a wheelchair.
The poster, seen in January in Liverpool, contained an image of a wheelchair with "Liverpool FC' on its back, accompanied by the text "You'll Never Walk Alone" and "(Or ever again if you play for Klopp)", referencing the club manager's tough training routines.
Two public complaints were made, but the ASA ruled that the material was unlikely to cause offence among disabled folks.

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