What security checks are customer service reps put through

zebedy

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This is probably a question for casino operators.

I was just wondering what if any security checks are performed on people wanting to become customer service reps for casino's.
How can we be confident that the rep we pass alot of our personnel info to isnt just keeping notes of the more sensitive info and selling it to the highest bidder.
Ive read that most CS reps are underpaid or casino's are using 3rd parties to supply the CS personnel how do we know that a CS rep isnt boosting there wage packet by selling on info. and if so would we really know anything about it before it was to late.
I doubt xyz casino would publicy admit a dodgy rep had sold info.

In reading the following 2 posts im just wondering how safe we actually are.

Ok i know the Ladbrokes incedent wasnt a CS rep but i guess the CS rep is privy to this information as when supplying documents to verify your account at a casino your often asked to send it to the CS department.
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The confidential records of millions of British gamblers who bet with top bookmaker Ladbrokes have been offered for sale to The Mail on Sunday.
The huge data theft is now at the centre of a criminal investigation after this newspaper was given the personal information of 10,000 Ladbrokes customers and offered access to its database of 4.5 million people in the UK and abroad.
Last night we alerted Ladbrokes to the damaging security breach and handed the customer files to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), Britain's data watchdog, which immediately began to investigate.
The records include customers' home addresses, details of their gambling history, customer account numbers, dates of birth, phone numbers and email addresses.
The database was offered for sale by a mysterious Australian. He claimed to be a computer security expert who had worked at Ladbrokes in Britain.
During protracted negotiations via email and in one phone call, the man, who gave his name only as 'Daniel', claimed to represent a company based in Melbourne, Australia.
The company, DSS Enterprises, is run by Dinitha Subasinghe, a Sri Lankan-born IT expert.
Last night, Mr Subasinghe denied any involvement in the data theft. He designs websites and also runs a wedding planning business with his British-born girlfriend Charlene King.
Australia's companies house describes Mr Subasinghe as a 'sole trader'. His recent work has involved designing websites for estate agents in Melbourne, but he also lists Ladbrokes and the UK Ministry of Defence as clients.

my marketing client gave me this casino list for free, im selling it.
basically have the following:-
12,000 american records
38,000 european records
full data
Player ID User Name Full Name Email Phone Country Date of Birth Date Turned Real Lock Status VIP Level Player Type Lifetime Gross Rake Lifetime Rake Costs Lifetime House Rake Lifetime Rake After Costs Lifetime Purchases Lifetime Payments Lifetime Adjustments Period Gross Rake Period Rake Costs Period House Rake Period Purchases Period Payments Period Adjustments Wallet Balance Action Points VIP Points M-T-D VIP Points Y-T-D
 

GGW Laurie

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In the Beautiful South !!
This is probably a question for casino operators.

I was just wondering what if any security checks are performed on people wanting to become customer service reps for casino's.
How can we be confident that the rep we pass alot of our personnel info to isnt just keeping notes of the more sensitive info and selling it to the highest bidder.
Ive read that most CS reps are underpaid or casino's are using 3rd parties to supply the CS personnel how do we know that a CS rep isnt boosting there wage packet by selling on info. and if so would we really know anything about it before it was to late.
I doubt xyz casino would publicy admit a dodgy rep had sold info.

In reading the following 2 posts im just wondering how safe we actually are.

Ok i know the Ladbrokes incedent wasnt a CS rep but i guess the CS rep is privy to this information as when supplying documents to verify your account at a casino your often asked to send it to the CS department.

I have always wondered about that myself:eek: i have heard that some of the online casinos in Costa Rica recruit CS peeps that can speak multi languages and they have to leave the country for so long before they can re enter to work again............Thats enough to make one leary imo.............laurie
 

zebedy

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I have always wondered about that myself:eek: i have heard that some of the online casinos in Costa Rica recruit CS peeps that can speak multi languages and they have to leave the country for so long before they can re enter to work again............Thats enough to make one leary imo.............laurie
I know, its scary to even think about it but with identity theft probably at the highest its ever been we are expected to trust these companies with all of our personnel details without really knowing who these people are.
i suppose the safest way to protect our details is not to play online altogether :(
 

Pinababy69

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I think this is an excellent question Zebedy, especially given the databases we've seen pop up for sale here. And the thread where the casino in question requested the player to send their password over unsecured channels, to close their account (including it being sent to general support, where any one of the CS reps has access to it). I'd love to hear from some of the reps on the forum on this issue as well.

I'd really like to know if past criminal history is checked, as well as a credit check...for starters.
 

onemoorebaby

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I was harrassed....contacted at home...emailed...by a member of cs... it got to the point i had to move house and change my number... i was grieving the death of my wife at the time and it was pure hell..... and the contact was not about getting me to deposit more... they took a strange and scary liking to me....
 

Wildfire7

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There are several ways this information can be researched by the humble player. Firstly I would draw a comparison with similar jobs, bearing similar responsibilities. Another way is to look for where these jobs are advertised and see what the requirements are for prospective candidates.

A similar job would be advertised as an administration type role, working in a call centre environment. Usually these jobs will require candidates to have previous experience in this field, with proven ability to be able to deal with members of the public professionally. They will also attract a large amount of candidates for any posts advertised. So even though the pay maybe low, they should not have trouble getting the right people. Providing they do the right checks.but do they?

Personally I would be surprised if casinos performed a CRB check on candidates. But I would expect them to perform a financial check on them. Here in the UK many jobs involving staff handling clients funds are not properly vetted. For example many shop workers and office workers are not subject to any checks other than confirming their right to work in the UK and their ID. Employers simply give the employee a form to fill out to confirm if they have a criminal record or not. That form stays on the employees file. So if any criminal convictions do come to light it will be grounds for gross misconduct.

Most of these casinos will not have HR departments who can run these checks, so instead it is left to the management to make an informed decision on new starters. Many I suspect are recruiting in a hurry to fill a post, due to poor retention levels.
In the UK most jobs advertised now require the candidate to pay for his own CRB check. So this would cost the casino nothing, as many job seekers will have one of these already which is valid for 2 years.

But the main problem I can see is not the integrity or honesty of the employee. It is the suitability of the employee who is eventually employed to do that job. It is no coincidence that under performing managers recruit under performing staff.

No amount of background vetting will weed out unsuitable candidates.
So IMO better interviewing skills by the recruitment department at the interview stage is whats needed. Along with properly checking out references from previous employees. These references alone are worth their weight in gold, when determining if someone is going to be good enough for the job.

Mike
 

felicie

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That is a really great question and I once thought I'd like to apply for a job as cs and even asked in live chat a couple of years ago at one of my favorite casinos. As I recall, she was sort of vague about it and told me to look her up if I ever got to that country. or something to that effect :).
 

GGW Laurie

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I wonder if a Rep could give us some inside scoop on how they hire and what they must pass before they become hired at their casino? It would be nice to get it straight from the ones that know more than we and maybe ease some minds along the way.......................laurie
 

zebedy

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I wonder if a Rep could give us some inside scoop on how they hire and what they must pass before they become hired at their casino? It would be nice to get it straight from the ones that know more than we and maybe ease some minds along the way.......................laurie
well it sure looks like that aint gonna happen :D
 

GGW Laurie

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well it sure looks like that aint gonna happen :D
I might PM a few Reps and see if they will respond and it may be something they are not able to talk about as i know some have read the thread, maybe one will reply.............I saw this commercial and it reminded me of this thread you started in a off beat sort of way, its a little long but is worth the watch:eek:..................laurie


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zebedy

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This was posted in another thread so it clearly is an issue that our info is not as secure as we think,

As there are ongoing issues with credit/debit cards I should mention that a visa debit card that I used only for online casino transactions was used to purchase over 1000 of retail goods.
Someone, somewhere stole my details. I only ever used this card at a few casino`s over the past 12 months.
I have been refunded the money by my bank as it was clearly fraud. The transactions were in $ converted to `s.
Those of you will say I should use a web wallet etc - however the fact remains somebody linked to a casino was involved in this theft.
I will not name the casino`s I used to play at - that would be unfair as I have no proof to identify any of them - perhaps if anyone has experienced a similar problem they could send me a private message.
I have now completely stopped all play at casino`s - cannot trust anyone. Its a shame as I did enjoy the slots.
I hope this never happens to anybody else

Sincerest best wishes

Snoddy
 

zebedy

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I might PM a few Reps and see if they will respond and it may be something they are not able to talk about as i know some have read the thread, maybe one will reply.............I saw this commercial and it reminded me of this thread you started in a off beat sort of way, its a little long but is worth the watch:eek:..................laurie
I think you may be right and believe reps have to sign a confidentiality aggreement so they couldnt answer if they wanted to :( pity really, it would have been good if somebody could have shed more light on this subject
 

GGW Laurie

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I think you may be right and believe reps have to sign a confidentiality aggreement so they couldnt answer if they wanted to :( pity really, it would have been good if somebody could have shed more light on this subject
Let me make a phone call or two, i wont be able to devulge the Reps names on here, but might be able to give us something to work with ;) brb.......laurie
 

GGW Laurie

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Sent: Tue 2/02/10 6:33 PM
To: Laurie (lauriexxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Security at a online casino or sports book is very loose...when I used to work for a big company there was an incident where an employee took a customers credit card info and bought many things online. However this is not the case anymore with security, whats going on now is taking the clients information.. Phone number, email etc. This is normal in the casino and sports book industry today.

If you can speak English then you can work for an Online casino. You need to understand bonuses and how they work..You are given a 3 days trial period if you cant speak well or understand the buss, then you are let go. that's basically how it works


Regards,
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

I trust this person, but will not say who the person is as they are running a legit casino now.it makes you wonder just how much of our personal info could be in the wrong hands ..............laurie
 

Casinomeister

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Great question, Zebedy!

I'll see if I can chase a few i-gaming reps done and see what their policies are.

Naturally, the security messures probably reflect what type of business it is - like with any business. Casinos and sportsbooks located in CR or other jurisdictions where there is no or little regulation will be problematic - cheap labor, low standards, etc. Over the past several years, there have been numerous reports of database theft coming from CR based casinos.

Casinos located elsewhere, and especially those that are either publicly traded or are big brand names, will more than likely have background checks related to the level of work the individual is doing. Normal CSR - that's a joe job, the security check may not be more stringent than that of a CSR at Dell computers or Amazon.com. It would probably increase as you go up the ladder. Again, I'm extrapolating here.

Casino operators are in most cases vigilant on protecting their databases, and will take every means on protecting these. Nonetheless, players should remain aware that nothing is safe online - that goes for your hotmail account as well as the account you have at xyzcasino.
 

Rhyzz

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Sent: Tue 2/02/10 6:33 PM
To: Laurie (lauriexxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Security at a online casino or sports book is very loose...when I used to work for a big company there was an incident where an employee took a customers credit card info and bought many things online. However this is not the case anymore with security, whats going on now is taking the clients information.. Phone number, email etc. This is normal in the casino and sports book industry today.

If you can speak English then you can work for an Online casino. You need to understand bonuses and how they work..You are given a 3 days trial period if you cant speak well or understand the buss, then you are let go. that's basically how it works


Regards,
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

I trust this person, but will not say who the person is as they are running a legit casino now.it makes you wonder just how much of our personal info could be in the wrong hands ..............laurie
Trust them or not, I sincerely doubt it's a legitimate Casino if that's how they recruit their staff :eek2:
 

bernynhel

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Yeah and how about my recent dealio with NetSpend pre-paid Visa? Funded the card at a Rite-Aid via Western Union and the money had been jacked by the time I got home after a couple hours shopping. And except for the shopping, my regular MO is: fund my card, get back home in 10 minutes and empty the card between QuickTender and casinos X,Y & Z before making a wager!

Latest on that: A fraud ring was making connections at Western Union partner retailers, (Rite-Aids, Safeways, whatever store other than a regular Western Union office), Customer writes in the card number on WU form, store employee memorizes the CVV codes and forwards info to crooks. They use that data with hacked pins and throw down cell phones and NetSpend accounts under phony names for the set up. Next time that customers loads a card at that retailer via Western Union, the crooked employee makes a phone call to his partner who heads for an ATM while transferring the victim's money onto their temporary NetSpend card via Cardholder Fund Transfers on a dedicated toll free number. The end of a day or two, several card balances emptied, throw out the NetSpend and the cell phone and start over. I led NetSpend and the cops to that Rite-Aid and the kid who worked there was on parole and ratted out the whole operation. Rite-Aid never hadda clue.

Still, I have never used a real credit card online and I started cutting out the first and last four digits on scanned images of cards for fax backs, etc Cut out the CVVs too. Within half an hour of loading my NetSpend Visa I always zero out the balance - the only thing some shady casino employee is gonna get outta my card - 0. While I can avoid clerks handling my cards by sticking to card swipe only loading methods, getting ripped off by some Joe Blow at WeeBee Casino in CR and trying to track that down? Fergitabuotit!

My NetSpend thread
 

Pinababy69

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I knew there had been a similar thread on this subject before, but had a hard time finding it. Starting on page five, there are numerous responses from various casino reps (Mario/Playshare, Pat/32Red, Betfred, Bellerock, and so on), that deal with this issue and similar security concerns. Well worth a read:

http://www.casinomeister.com/forums...count-security-concerns-multiple-casinos.html

There are some pretty detailed responses in there that may answer some of these questions. Maybe if you have a specific casino that you play at, and have concerns....PM'ing the rep involved might be helpful? Just a thought, as maybe not all reps are comfortable posting publicly re: security measures...as Laurie had suggested earlier as well.
 

NicolasJohnson

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Ok guys, as somebody mentioned, I am bound by confidentiality agreements. Having said that, this applies only to the specifics of the company of I work for, not the general, 8+ years of industry knowledge that I have.

What I will say is it really boils down to the individual company. Some gaming companies handle private date extremely well, more than a lot of Fortune 500 companies. This industry is ultra competitive and some people go to incredible lengths to ensure security. Of course there is another end to the spectrum.

To give you an idea, here are just SOME of the security measures SOME casinos take in regards to personal data and employee security (there are other measures that are used, but I can't say everything as it will be heard by those who would abuse it :p )

1- Criminal Checks are a lot more common than you think here. Credit checks are not done since we don't have the same credit system as in the US it isn't as easy.

2- Fingerprints, personal data, photocopies of identification, and Confidentiality contracts are just some of the things that are put in file when an employee joins. These files do not expire even after the employee is no longer with the company.

3- Up to 3 levels of security confirmation to enter the building. Full hand fingerprint scan, building access card and then magnetic access cards for different parts of the building. All watched over by big security guys.

4- Cameras at every point of the building. Both on top of employees as well as ones to monitor 'under desk activity'.

5- Recording, monitoring, compiling of employee computer activity.

6- No paper leaves the casino floor. No exceptions. Employees can only bring in and out restricted personal items into the casino floor and only after being checked by security (if you take a book in to read during lunch, the pages would be checked for information leaks by security before you could take it out)

7- Databases have seeds. Meaning accounts that aren't real, but if someone was stealing info they would take it. The email, phone number, etc all resolves to us, so we know if and when something was taken, and who is using it and how.

8- Drug tests.

9- Different information access for different employee levels. Many places have levels of information access that are given out to different levels of employees. So that old trustworthy, well paid employees end up handling sensitive data and new ones are slowly given better access.

Furthermore, the operating side of this industry isn't big at all. I'm completely used to bumping into old co-workers when I get a job. It is a tight nit community where everyone knows each other... or at least I know someone who knows that someone else who is applying for a job. So it is easy to single out the bad apples.

Something that is very common is the better employees tend to get the better jobs and recommend other good employees, and the more untrusted employees tend to end up working at rogues since good employees tend to want to avoid bad places. Not saying there aren't any good people working at any Rogue casino, I'm just saying that goodness attracts goodness just like something rotten will attract rats.

And to finish this off, the security measures I listed are of course not employed by all companies. Some companies will hire known thieves and even allow employees to get drunk during working hours. It really boils down to the individual company.

I say all this not only based on my own personal experience working for several gaming companies, but also the second hand information I get from Friends and family who also work in the industry.

Kind Regards,
Nicolas Johnson
Regal Affiliates Manager
& Vegas Regal Casino Rep.
 

zebedy

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I'll see if I can chase a few i-gaming reps done and see what their policies are.

Casino operators are in most cases vigilant on protecting their databases, and will take every means on protecting these. Nonetheless, players should remain aware that nothing is safe online - that goes for your hotmail account as well as the account you have at xyzcasino.
Thanks CM
It would be nice to find out where and which casino's these security leaks
are coming from or even what licensing jurisdiction,
I mean im more likely to open an account at a casino that is licensed in the UK than one Licensed in CR just because of the tougher regulations they have.
but if the security leaks are coming from uk based regulated casino's then, housten we have a problem.:eek:
Would it be worth putting an extra tick box on the accredited list on what security tests a casino runs on hiring reps, just for extra reassurance, as with other sensitive info i expect casino reps would be more inclined to talk to you than make public announcements on the forum.

I knew there had been a similar thread on this subject before, but had a hard time finding it. Starting on page five, there are numerous responses from various casino reps (Mario/Playshare, Pat/32Red, Betfred, Bellerock, and so on), that deal with this issue and similar security concerns. Well worth a read:

http://www.casinomeister.com/forums...count-security-concerns-multiple-casinos.html

There are some pretty detailed responses in there that may answer some of these questions. Maybe if you have a specific casino that you play at, and have concerns....PM'ing the rep involved might be helpful? Just a thought, as maybe not all reps are comfortable posting publicly re: security measures...as Laurie had suggested earlier as well.
You must have the memory of an elephant :D :thumbsup:

Ok guys, as somebody mentioned, I am bound by confidentiality agreements. Having said that, this applies only to the specifics of the company of I work for, not the general, 8+ years of industry knowledge that I have.
Thanks Nicolas for the detailed response,
I had no idea of the many security measures that were in place, how niave i am :(


although in reading things like

Up to 3 levels of security confirmation to enter the building. Full hand fingerprint scan, building access card and then magnetic access cards for different parts of the building. All watched over by big security guys.
and
Cameras at every point of the building. Both on top of employees as well as ones to monitor 'under desk activity'.
i though i had entered an episode of 24 :D

i suppose at the end of the day it all comes down to getting the gaming industry regulated everywhere and untill certain goverments do this it ie CR or the USA it certain leaks will keep happening.
 

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