Washington Post Investigates Cont.

NASHVEGAS

Banned User - flamming, disrespecting admin,
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A link below to today's lengthy article from the Washington Post.....Today's article goes beyond the Poker Investigation (which a link to is provided by Jetset in the 60 Minutes Story thread).....This article is pursuant to the entire industry......Most of the issues have been discussed in various threads at CM but now The Post.

Today's article is too legnthy to post (npi) in entirety but I will post the first of four pages below.

Furthermore, you may or may not be able to access the the article from the link. If not, you simply need to register an account. It is painless!.....BTW, at 1:00 PM EST TODAY , The Post is having an interactive chat regarding the Poker Scandal and Investigation. The link below or Jetset's provides more info. and a link for the chat I assume!!

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Inside Bet | Should Internet Gambling Be Legal?
Prohibition vs. Regulation Debated As U.S. Bettors Use Foreign Sites


By Gilbert M. Gaul
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, December 1, 2008


By many measures, Neteller PLC was a huge success. Founded in 1999, the financial services company signed up millions of customers and saw its market value soar to almost $2 billion.

But in 2006, Congress passed legislation that effectively banned the company from the U.S. market. Later, federal agents arrested the firm's two founders and seized their pricey Malibu beach houses and millions of dollars in other assets.

Neteller's crime: It processed payments for U.S. poker players and thousands of other Americans who were using Internet gambling sites.

Even as bettors around the world gamble millions of dollars online, confusion reigns about the legal status of those bets and the companies that handle them. According to the Justice Department, Neteller was "a colossal criminal enterprise masquerading as a legitimate business," violating a 47-year-old law aimed at organized-crime bookies. Prosecutors contend the law applies to any and all betting on the Internet, as well as the electronic money transfers enabling those bets.

For critics of online gambling, the Neteller case and a flurry of other high-profile prosecutions are welcome crackdowns on a murky and unregulated industry. "It's an underworld wrought with scams and schemes," said Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear (D), spearheading a state effort to block online bets.

But to some legal scholars and Internet gambling proponents, the government's efforts highlight a widening disconnect between 21st-century technology and the 20th-century laws used to protect Americans from gambling. "Congress shouldn't be trying to make criminals out of people who have taken the game from the kitchen table to the computer table," said John Pappas, executive director of the Poker Players Alliance, a Washington lobbying group claiming just under 1 million members.

The alliance and other backers are pushing for the federal government to license and regulate Internet gambling. They say that the current ban leaves players vulnerable to abuse at loosely regulated offshore sites, as occurred in the AbsolutePoker and UltimateBet cheating scandals. Gambling is already widespread, with casinos, slots parlors and state lotteries. The government would be better off collecting tax revenue and creating strong laws to prevent cheating, they argue.

Until a decade ago, gamblers had limited choices. They could go to a casino or horse track in states with legalized betting, or find a private poker game. The Internet erased those borders: Players now can jump from site to site on the Web, bypassing regulators at home. When Neteller retreated from the U.S. market, Internet poker pro Serge Ravitch simply switched to another firm to handle his accounts. "It took two minutes," he said. Online poker players pay for their bets in a variety of ways, including prepaid debit cards, electronic transfers and bank wires.

Initially, most Internet gambling sites were sports books and online casinos based in Caribbean and Central American countries with low taxes and minimal regulations, according to a recent study by Canadian researchers Robert J. Williams and Robert T. Wood. In January 1996, an Internet casino in Antigua became the first to accept a wager, followed two years later by the first online poker room.

Today, there are thousands of gambling Web sites worldwide, from Antigua to Malta to the Philippines. Most are privately owned and have no connections to land-based casinos, which have been reluctant to jeopardize their U.S. licenses because of the uncertain legal status of online gambling.

A spokeswoman for the American Gaming Association, a Washington trade group, said about half of the casino companies would like to see Internet gambling legalized, while the remaining firms either oppose it or favor a federal study of the Internet's effect on compulsive gambling and other issues.

"It is doubtful whether an Internet regulation bill will ever be passed until Congress can point to an objective comprehensive study that would justify regulation," said Joseph M. Kelly, a professor of business law at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and a gambling industry consultant.....................................................................................



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maxd

Complaints (PAB) Manager
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Here's an interesting related article talking about the Kahnawake folks:

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POSTED: 10:30 AM ET, 11/29/2008 by The Editors

In reporting his two-part series about online poker, Inside Bet, Post writer Gilbert M. Gaul learned that the two big cheating scandals occurred at Web sites owned by the same person -- Joseph Tokwiro Norton, former grand chief of the Kahnawake Mohawk tribe located on a reservation near Montreal.

The Kahnawake became the unlikely hosts for computer servers that handle not only Norton's companies but many of the world's biggest online poker businesses. In this edition of Reporter's Notebook, Gaul explains how this came to be:

At first glance, Joe Norton and the Kahnawake might seem like surprising players to control a large share of the $18 billion Internet gambling business.

While in his twenties, Norton worked as an ironworker helping to build the World Trade Center in New York City. At the age of 28 he was elected to the Mohawk Council of Kahnawake, the governing body for the 8,000-member tribe located minutes from Montreal. Two years later, Norton took over as grand chief, a position he held for more than two decades.

For years, the Kahnawake had relied on cigarette sales and payments from the federal government to get by. Under Norton, they began to look at gambling as a way to lift up the tribe's economic fortunes. ....
(see the remainder of the article
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)

PS. I don't have a Washington Post membership and I was able to see both articles. That might change as the articles age a bit.
 

1819

Dormant account
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Jan 25, 2006
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ny,nj,fla
that's great nash. do you think while you are reading the w post you can look in the classifieds and find cleveland a qb for sunday? we come into your barn with our 3rd stringer.:)
 

NASHVEGAS

Banned User - flamming, disrespecting admin,
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Location
MERS
Here's an interesting related article talking about the Kahnawake folks:



PS. I don't have a Washington Post membership and I was able to see both articles. That might change as the articles age a bit.
Glad it is working as I thought I may have killed it when I was eventually blocked and had to go find my PW to log-in.....Not sure how the Post determines (I do know the WSJ always blocks me no matter where I access the link,lol) when you must log-in or register but I had read a few articles (including the Norton article) before I had to log-in!

I thought the by the numbers stats piece was interesting (may post) but who knows how accurate they are. Hell, I'll just assume the numbers/stats are within 3 standard deviations and thus accurate enough:D
 

NASHVEGAS

Banned User - flamming, disrespecting admin,
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Location
MERS
that's great nash. do you think while you are reading the w post you can look in the classifieds and find cleveland a qb for sunday? we come into your barn with our 3rd stringer.:)
I did.....Ken Dorsey:p:D:p but Vince Young is available. OOPS, the trade deadline is long gone just like Savage and/or Crennel....That said, respect, on any given Sunday....Back to the Post,sorry!!
 

jetset

RIP Brian
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Feb 22, 2001
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Earth
Annnnnd....another interesting Washington Post article on the US legal quagmire.

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Writer Gilbert M. Gaul has been a busy scribe!

Cancel that - I've just noticed that NashVegas has already posted this!
 
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