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Update on DOJ vs Dotcom/Megaupload

Discussion in 'Computers and Internet Geekland' started by Mousey, May 31, 2012.

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    May 31, 2012
  1. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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    5 people like this.
  2. Jun 11, 2012
  3. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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  4. Jun 11, 2012
  5. vinylweatherman

    vinylweatherman You type well loads CAG MM

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    DOJ tries to kill faith in the ability of cloud based data storage services to protect users from data losses:rolleyes:

    How can any user now contemplate having the ONLY copy of their precious data entrusted to a cloud based storage locker. No matter how well run, a court could arbitrarily seize and destroy ALL data on the basis that SOME data on the service is illegal. No user can know what other users are storing on such services, therefore it's back to the old days, make damn sure you keep your own archives as back up to any cloud based storage.

    This position will NOT prevent the continued circulation of the pirated content, since unlike the data of inocent users, there will be many copies floating around, and the loss of a few copies from Megaupload will be nothing more than a minor inconvenience.

    Had Mr Goodwin not shown such blind faith in cloud services, he would have burned a couple of archive copies on data DVD, and would have faced only a few minutes work in getting access to his data, and not much longer finding an alternative cloud service with which to share it with customers.

    Some of this data cannot be replaced by any amount of damages, such as pictures and videos of your children growing up. The issue here is that the data DOES exist, but is locked away destined to be destroyed by the stubbornness of the film industry and government.

    The whole basis of this fight was to protect the owners of such content, but clearly small time film makers are NOT being protected, and if anything are being shat upon from a great height by having their artistic content confiscated and destroyed so that the big conglomerates can protect their multi-million dollar income stream.

    How would THEY like it if every copy of their greatest blockbusters were to be seized and destroyed, and their only remedy was to claim damages and shoot the films all over again.

    This has the potential to make the industry even more unpopular than when it was dragging "granny" to court and suing for $1,000,000 for 5 songs one of her grandchildren downloaded on her PC. The entire cloud storge industry should be fighting this, not just Megaupload. It sets a precedent that makes the entire concept unworkable as a means of ensuring critical data is securely stored with almost no risk of loss.

    I have always doubted putting my data into the hands of a cloud service and not bothering to do my own backups, and this case has vindicated my view. The big question is which data locker gets hit next, as they ALL contain significant amounts of data that would be deemed "pirated".
     
  6. Jun 12, 2012
  7. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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    I had a big row with Rapidshare a couple years ago.... I buy digital scrapbooking kits. Most run 200mb and larger. These are downloaded from the designer online to my hard drive after purchase. A couple years ago, my main hard drive was beginning make that ominous clickety click sound. Critical data I backed up to a smaller external. But there was no room for many of my kits... so I uploaded them to Rapidshare.

    Yes, eventually, the hard drive went kaflooy. I bought another, installed it and the OS and was up and running. Then I went to Rapidshare to download my kits. Gone. Every last one of them. Hundreds of dollars and gigs of kits had been deleted.

    What had happened was this. Someone out there in interweb land had been sharing purchased scrapbooking kits they had uploaded to Rapidshare. Even though I'd never shared mine, they were deleted as they had the designer name in the filename. Well, yeah... I wanted to be able to tell what they were.

    Long story short... Rapidshare would not restore the files as they were copyrighted materials, even though I sent them copies of my purchase invoices. The designers wouldn't/couldn't help as these were purchases made over a couple of years.

    Now... I have 6 externals.... LOL

    As for Megaupload, I had some files uploaded there from work, for easy access from any location, any computer, for anyone in the company who needed them. Poof!

    Now I just buy 16g flash drives by the bucket and hand them out to the boss and a couple others like candy - and tell them they'll be fired on the spot if they lose one. :eek2:

    Screw the cloud and the DOJ, too.
     
  8. Jun 12, 2012
  9. harrys99

    harrys99 Dormant account

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    Excellent post Mousey. And kudos to you for the way you are managing the crappy hand you were dealt.
     
  10. Jun 12, 2012
  11. vinylweatherman

    vinylweatherman You type well loads CAG MM

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    So, they pick on some Scrapbook kits, yet they STILL host the "hard stuff" like films and TV Series, which are pretty obvious from the filename, and sell a premium service that allows you unlimited download to all 4 seasons of Fringe (for example).

    Had it not been for my sister in law, I would not know WTF you were on about, but I have received an education that there is indeed this murky underworld in the scrapbooking scene. It also shows that like online casinos, sites like Rapidshare can arbitrarily delete the data of innocent users on a whim, based on nothing more than the fact that other users have shared similar data types.

    Where work files are lost, this can have a serious impact on business. I bet it would be different if some big conglomerate with expensive lawyers had lost key files from Megaupload that had cost them millions to put right. They would have set some big dogs with big teeth on the DoJ, and I bet they would not have had such a cavalier attitude to data owned by non infringers as they show towards the "little man" like Mr Goodwin.

    I bet all the really important data will not so easily be entrusted to such cloud based companies, and they would become even more dependent on the pirates for customers.

    At least when your drive plays up you have a chance to do something about it, but when the DoJ or a cloud storage company acts, by the time you find out it is too late.

    Given the digital nature of the data, I don't see why the original designers were so unhelpful, it is not as though they had to produce a replacement set of physical materials, just a copy of a digital file, which you would have to download and archive at your own expense.

    It is the same reason I never went for the original iTunes model, since you never really owned the music, you merely rented it for the lifetime of your PC, since it was tied to that device because of the DRM
     
  12. Jun 22, 2012
  13. harrys99

    harrys99 Dormant account

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    Kim Dotcom's current lifestyle doesn't appear to be too bad.

    Megaupload's Kim Dotcom Admits to 'Racketeering' in Tweets


    Dotcom has been tweeting about his activity, meeting Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak and hinting about the launch of a music cloud storage application called MegaBox. In particular, he's been showing off his humorous side with zingers aimed at the U.S. government . (taken from HR 6/22/12)

    Update on DOJ vs Dotcom/Megaupload: kim1.jpg,Jun 22, 2012

    Conspiracy to commit racketeering!

    Update on DOJ vs Dotcom/Megaupload: kim2.jpg,Jun 22, 2012
    At the police. 3 times a week. Bail condition. Flight risk minimization.

    Update on DOJ vs Dotcom/Megaupload: kim3_6.jpg,Jun 22, 2012
    A little sneak peak of my upcoming website. The truth will come out.

    Update on DOJ vs Dotcom/Megaupload: 51c50598bb0c11e1a9f71231382044a1_6.jpg,Jun 22, 2012
    Hilarious cartoon about Kim Dotcom and the US Government. I need to lose weight (at least in cartoons).
     

    Attached Files:

    • Update on DOJ vs Dotcom/Megaupload: kim.jpg,Jun 22, 2012
      kim.jpg
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    Last edited: Jun 22, 2012
  14. Jun 29, 2012
  15. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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    New Zealand court rules Megaupload raid was illegal

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  16. Jul 17, 2012
  17. Mousey

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    Feds say MU subject to US laws

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  18. Jul 18, 2012
  19. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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    NZ judge removes himself from MU case

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  20. Sep 24, 2012
  21. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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    NZ launches inquiry into spying in Megaupload case

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  22. Sep 24, 2012
  23. vinylweatherman

    vinylweatherman You type well loads CAG MM

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    Well, the US government feel it is fine to punish the innocent users of the service who did not use it to store and distribute copyrighted material without consent by refusing to allow even non infringing data to be returned. Even though Dotcom clearly made money from those who DID use the service to break copyright rules, he needs to get away with it in the interests of the innocent users getting their data back. The US could then launch a more targetted investigation against the infringing uses, and once Dotcom wins, require him to wind up the service in an orderly manner, and redesign it to prevent infringement in the future as well as bear the cost of vetting the data to separate the infringing data from the innocent, such that only non infringing data is returned.

    If he is found guilty, and the US succeeds in ordering the destruction of innocent users' data just to protect big corporations by deleting just a minority of the illicit copies floating around the internet, it will be a battle won, but a war lost, for the big media companies. It will be an end to trust in cloud services for protecting critical data, and back to "old school" making one's own backups on CD, DVD, pen drives, external hard drives, etc.

    I had serious concerns about such cloud services before this happened, and now a similar service provided by my ISP has caused users to be unable to access their data due to an unforseen technical issue, even though assurances have been given that access will be restored and no data lost. Fine in the long term, but no good where access is required immediately, such as for making tax returns, business accounts, etc.
     
  24. Sep 27, 2012
  25. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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    I find this funny in a way... Here in the US such an 'investigation' into the actions of the FBI or similar agency would take many months and half a dozen committees .....
     
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  26. Sep 27, 2012
  27. conker

    conker CM Advisory Group admin - Meister Minions Manager CAG MM webmeister

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    I can't get my head round this case, it seems like such a joke. I really like NZ and the people from that country and they seem to have a much different view this Kim's crimes compared to the Americans.
     
  28. Sep 27, 2012
  29. vinylweatherman

    vinylweatherman You type well loads CAG MM

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    How come the FBI can seize and destroy the data from users that is very clearly NOT infringing any copyrights, such as the small businesses that used the service to send stuff to their clients, or users who backed up their important files there thinking "the cloud" is going to be more reliable than their hard drive and a couple of CD/DVD backups.

    In a normal police investigation, the property of bystanders is not forefeit, and must be returned to them at the earliest opportunity. It shows that when big corporate entities are involved, a different set of laws applies that allows the weak innocents to be trampled underfoot in the rush to catch the guilty with no appeal nor recourse to damages for those trampled innocents.

    I wonder if these big coporates have stopped to consider how damaging it could be to their reputations if innocent users' data did end up getting destroyed, sending businesses under and putting ordinary people out of work. They could find they win this last battle, but lose the war because people will see that the law does not apply if you are big enough to bully the administration, and the people will feel they no longer should "play fair" by avoiding freely available movies and music and pay the bloated corporates through the nose for content that is designed to prevent them enjoying it as they wish by insisting they can only use overpriced "approved hardware" to view/listen.

    Their battle is pretty pointless at this stage, any content they manage to get destroyed will not make the slightest difference to the availabilty of their pirated content from other sources, in fact, it is the users who used the service to house their library of pirated content that have probably already reconstructed it from the various sources still available. Only users who had unique data that was ONLY stored on Megaupload will suffer, as the data would be their own creation, a bespoke "one off" which cannot be found on any other pirate service.

    If anyone still thinks a cloud based file locker is the safest way to preserve data, they need their head examined. All it takes is a big conglomerate to find other users have used the service to house illegal copies of their content, and they can engineer a "take down" with no right of appeal for ANYONE to get their data back.

    It will mean FEWER people will entrust such services for their own unique data, leaving them even MORE the preserve of those using the service as a means to distribute pirated copies without having to clog their own bandwidth by seeding torrents.

    If they think they will win the war, they should ask "have we won the war against malware yet?". The answer will give them a clue to how likely it is that pirated content will soon be a thing of the past.

    The answer may lie in flooding the internet with legal content that is much easier to use, and more reliable in delivery, than pirated content could ever be. Users would then go for safety and reliabilty, and will find all their needs met by the legal sources, so would not spend time and effort trying to track down a pirate copy, and then risk it being a malware ridden fake.
     
  30. Nov 1, 2012
  31. Mousey

    Mousey Ueber Meister Mouse CAG

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    Megaupload founder unveils file-sharing sequel

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