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Slots of Vegas...Yes I Know

Discussion in 'Casino Complaints - Bonus Issues' started by SeattleSinner, Mar 8, 2009.

    Mar 8, 2009
  1. SeattleSinner

    SeattleSinner Dormant account PABnononaccred2

    Occupation:
    Professional Gambler
    Location:
    USA
    I know this casino is rogue, but they had a no deposit $200 bonus offer which I completed and met all the t's&c's. I had nothing to lose since I didn't make any deposits or risk any cash.

    Now they are delaying payment. I have read in the forum of this group stiffing people out of a few grand, but do they ever pay anyone out?
     
  2. Mar 8, 2009
  3. same_old

    same_old Dormant account PABaccred webmeister

    Occupation:
    12th man
    Location:
    Australia
    why do you care then, you know the reason they are rogue dont you??

    If you knwo about these guy's you know it is a gamble to see your money.

    I suggest you just think that your not giong to get the money and if by some reason you do get it, well then thats a bonus...

    Let it go mate!
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Mar 8, 2009
  5. kmay87

    kmay87 Meister Member PABnononaccred PABaccred2

    Occupation:
    Barrister
    Location:
    England
    I agree with same old, but I can still see why you did it. If your chances of losing are 0, although by entering your details you could be at risk to spam and having accounts signed up for you elsewhere, then sometimes it can be worth a go.

    In my opinion, not all of the rogued casinos apply to everyone. While I wouldn't suggest anyone to play at them, some casinos are listed because of things such as refusing to close players' accounts, or their business practice. In your case, you signed up at the worst group in existence so only you can decide what to do. :)

    If you do get paid, I wouldn't go shouting about it too much. In the past we've all probably got paid by one of the rogues, but you risk the chance that a new member, not understanding why casinos are in the rogue pit, will part with their own cash at one of these. Playing with their money is ok, but putting your own in and hoping to see it again....unlikely to happen. Often.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Mar 8, 2009
  7. vinylweatherman

    vinylweatherman You type well loads CAG MM

    Occupation:
    STILL At Leisure
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Those who HAVE been paid from such offers have had to nag them constantly, and it has taken a long while.
    One should not underestimate the value of the personal details that you have "sold" to them by accepting the free chip. Maybe THIS is why they are firing off these free chip offers in such VAST volumes. The argument about accepting a free chip for zero risk of loss, and only a chance to win fails when legitimate (according to terms and conditions) winnings are not paid, as this then simply becomes a method of compiling a database of people who are probably online casino players. Even if they don't get a deposit from you, they have made money all the same each time they sell on your details to a spam company, or even direct to another casino.
    If they have rogue employees, or even OWNERS, they may go beyond simply selling your data to spammers, but could also sell it to organised crime syndicates, who would use it to steal your identity in order to make money in some way from it.
     
  8. Mar 9, 2009
  9. Mouche12

    Mouche12 Kitty Lover PABnononaccred PABnonaccred PABnoaccred

    Occupation:
    Translator and facilities manager
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    If they have a copy of your passport, how can criminal organizations use those your identity with only a canned copy of ID to make money? Just wondering....:confused:
     
  10. Mar 9, 2009
  11. kmay87

    kmay87 Meister Member PABnononaccred PABaccred2

    Occupation:
    Barrister
    Location:
    England
    The list is endless. They could sell them to a third party for a start.

    Think about all the juicy details available on your passport. Presuming someone, somewhere has the ability to create perfect copies, all they would need to do is extract your details and paste them onto the new passport, with a new picture.....now this passport has your correct details, it has your passport number so the only difference is the picture. Now take the real passport, and the newly created one, to someone who knows neither person, and ask them which is which :confused:

    With the new biometric passports coming into effect, this will presumably become much harder to achieve. But sending your details off to a rogue outfit such as these makes the process much easier for them.
     
  12. Mar 13, 2009
  13. vinylweatherman

    vinylweatherman You type well loads CAG MM

    Occupation:
    STILL At Leisure
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    It's possible to steal an identity with only partial information. The craft of "blagging" is used, a mix of psychology along with good knowledge of how security systems work in many CS departments. "Blaggers" seek to convince the CS agent that they are the person to whom the information belongs, but need a little help because something that SHOULD work does not. The aim is to get the CS agent to let further information slip out as they believe they are dealling with the correct person. This extra puzzle piece makes each step in the "blagging" process easier. In the end, they have all they need to do some SERIOUS damage. Instances include:-

    1) You go away (has to be extended holiday), and find an ID thief has sold your own HOUSE, and made off with the proceeds.

    2) Credit taken out in YOUR name, YOU are chased for repayment, your credit history is trashed, wrecking YOUR chances of getting ANY kind of credit, INCLUDING a mobile phone, gas, electric supply under "normal" terms etc. (This is the common one, it is lucrative, and pretty easy once all the information has been gathered). It is worse if you have a history of regularly moving home.

    3) Illegal entry into the country on YOUR passport, although this is getting progressively harder. Normally, they DON'T just copy the image, they pass the INFORMATION within it to an expert passport forger, who uses it to forge a near perfect passport with all YOUR info, but the PHOTO of the illegal entrant. BIG MONEY changes hands for illegal entry into the UK, and a forged passport, although not cheap, is NOT anywhere near the biggest expense an illegal immigrant is fleeced out of by the people traffickers who make all the big money.

    4) Confusion caused by identity theft can run deep, it can even result in national databases becoming corrupt, and remaining so for many years. There was a case featured where duplicate UK National Insurance numbers were issued. Normally, these are issued at birth, and remain with you for life. If you are "cloned" this way (someone else uses your number), you can actually cease to exist in true Orwellian 1984 style, with the clone becoming the "genuine article". This happened with the case featured, withy BOTH persons insisting THEY were the true holder of the number, and once the authorities made the decision as to who was right, the other person was erased from database history. This was particularly galling, since the authorities had got it wrong, and it was the "clone" that "survived. It was sorted out in the end, but it revealed this was NOT a "one off", and one main source was people with SIMILAR names getting confused, so just imagine what someone using your EXACT details could do!!
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. Jun 23, 2009
  15. osulle

    osulle Ueber Meister CAG mm4 mm1

    Occupation:
    life
    Location:
    Northern hemisphere
    Identity theft

    Thanks Vinlyweather man for such an insightful post. I had never considered identity theft although it does seem rather obvious once you think about it. I mean these rougue outfits are not regulated and I am sure investigating and taking legal action against them for illigeal acts would be rather difficult since it isn't even clear what juristicition they are in. You have definitley helped open my eyes as to what can happen.

    Thanks:notworthy
     

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