Serious misleading spam (The worst I have seen)

sparkz

Dormant account
Joined
Dec 27, 2007
Location
Earth
At a glance earlier I had this email:

Hi

I am a representative of Gold Ring casino, and I have an exclusive offer for you to try out our online casino games.

I’m offering you €30 free - no deposit necessary - to enjoy our slots, roulette and blackjack games. All you need to do is open a free casino account using link below.

I know you’ll like our casino enough to make a deposit and when you do you’ll automatically receive a 200% bonus on your deposit amount for use with our games.

That means a deposit of just €25 will instantly get you €75.

Simply visit our casino to qualify for the offer.

qgoldringskyvip.com

Regards
John Smith
Casino Manager


Just take a look at the link... Looks like a casino called "Gold ring club casino".

After checking if the place is rogue, I couldnt find any info about it. Thought may as well have a mess about with the free chip.

Downloaded the casino... a file called SetupCasino_8de663.exe


Opened it up and guess what?? casino installer came up with graphics and design of "7 regal".

Either they have a bad reputation and are trying to hide their casino under this "gold ring club" or some affiliate has been doing a sly 1, made a fake new casino website front and hid his affiliate ID in the download link.

Probably the latter is correct. Quite logical if they get paid per dload of 7 regal casino.

Spam came from: [email protected]
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Andy Walker

Full Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
UK
At a glance earlier I had this email:

Hi

I am a representative of Gold Ring casino, and I have an exclusive offer for you to try out our online casino games.

I’m offering you €30 free - no deposit necessary - to enjoy our slots, roulette and blackjack games. All you need to do is open a free casino account using link below.

I know you’ll like our casino enough to make a deposit and when you do you’ll automatically receive a 200% bonus on your deposit amount for use with our games.

That means a deposit of just €25 will instantly get you €75.

Simply visit our casino to qualify for the offer.

qgoldringskyvip.com

Regards
John Smith
Casino Manager


Just take a look at the link... Looks like a casino called "Gold ring club casino".

After checking if the place is rogue, I couldnt find any info about it. Thought may as well have a mess about with the free chip.

Downloaded the casino... a file called SetupCasino_8de663.exe


Opened it up and guess what?? casino installer came up with graphics and design of "7 regal".

Either they have a bad reputation and are trying to hide their casino under this "gold ring club" or some affiliate has been doing a sly 1, made a fake new casino website front and hid his affiliate ID in the download link.

Probably the latter is correct. Quite logical if they get paid per dload of 7 regal casino.

Spam came from: [email protected]

Straw Poll here. Who opens spam emails from an unknown sender unless of course the spam filter got it wrong? Who even thinks about chasing after a juicy big carrot from an unknown source and lastly who clicks on a downloadable link with an executable file that could possibly relieve you of your funds without even the first spin of a virtual reel? Just curious that’s all. I tend to be wary.....
 

vinylweatherman

You type well loads
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Location
United Kingdom
This is an old trick. It's been going on for years, and what have the casinos done about it?

NOTHING:mad:


This, however, will all change in 2 years time.

Once we have secondary licensing in place here in the UK, it will be possible to complain about any UK authorised casino using this method and expect (although much of this is hope at present), something more robust than "there's not much we can do about it as it is an offshore company".

This 2 years should be spent cleaning up the affiliate marketing system so that affiliates that use this trick are warned off in no uncertain terms.

Hopefully, this will reduce the amount of deceptive marketing.

I have even seen accredited casinos marketed in this way.

The problem is that this will land in the inboxes of new and inexperienced players, perhaps shortly after they have tried one dodgy casino that has sold on their contact details.

It's not the worst. There was some guy who "once worked for a Microgaming casino" and "liked your action" so much that he stole the database and is now inviting "his favourites" to his new (dodgy) casino. What was particularly scary was that he didn't just have our email addresses, but our names and phone numbers:eek: He even phoned me a few times, but I didn't answer.

Somewhere, there is a Microgaming casino that had a rogue employee who nicked the database on his way out. He probably sold it on, and someone has thought of this idea as posing as an ex VIP manager to lure players into his lair, where they are sure to me jerked around VIP style.

I don't think they get paid just for having someone download the casino, it takes the registration of an account to tag the player to the affiliate, and a certain minimum amount of action is required to trigger commission, although this could be merely the taking up of the spammed welcome offer.

Jerk THEM around, insist on speaking to "Gold Ring casino support", and that you want a VIP host, not the usual lackey, because you have a very large bankroll and want to get some VIP treatment. String them along and eventually say that because Gold Ring doesn't actually exist, you are not prepared to play at the casino you ended up with instead as the level of dishonesty makes them a "high risk casino". Better still, try and get the offender's affiliate tag to them, as the affiliate that screwed them out of a "whale".
 

Andy Walker

Full Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
UK
This is an old trick. It's been going on for years, and what have the casinos done about it?

NOTHING:mad:


This, however, will all change in 2 years time.

Once we have secondary licensing in place here in the UK, it will be possible to complain about any UK authorised casino using this method and expect (although much of this is hope at present), something more robust than "there's not much we can do about it as it is an offshore company".

This 2 years should be spent cleaning up the affiliate marketing system so that affiliates that use this trick are warned off in no uncertain terms.

Hopefully, this will reduce the amount of deceptive marketing.

I have even seen accredited casinos marketed in this way.

The problem is that this will land in the inboxes of new and inexperienced players, perhaps shortly after they have tried one dodgy casino that has sold on their contact details.

It's not the worst. There was some guy who "once worked for a Microgaming casino" and "liked your action" so much that he stole the database and is now inviting "his favourites" to his new (dodgy) casino. What was particularly scary was that he didn't just have our email addresses, but our names and phone numbers:eek: He even phoned me a few times, but I didn't answer.

Somewhere, there is a Microgaming casino that had a rogue employee who nicked the database on his way out. He probably sold it on, and someone has thought of this idea as posing as an ex VIP manager to lure players into his lair, where they are sure to me jerked around VIP style.

I don't think they get paid just for having someone download the casino, it takes the registration of an account to tag the player to the affiliate, and a certain minimum amount of action is required to trigger commission, although this could be merely the taking up of the spammed welcome offer.

Jerk THEM around, insist on speaking to "Gold Ring casino support", and that you want a VIP host, not the usual lackey, because you have a very large bankroll and want to get some VIP treatment. String them along and eventually say that because Gold Ring doesn't actually exist, you are not prepared to play at the casino you ended up with instead as the level of dishonesty makes them a "high risk casino". Better still, try and get the offender's affiliate tag to them, as the affiliate that screwed them out of a "whale".

Perhaps a better way to deal with this would be to use this method. Don’t bother with spam emails, this will help avoiding clicking on links with downloadable executable files that may interact with a computers operating system at fundamental levels, possibly leading to identity theft, this being the capture of personal banking details and pass codes.

Just a thought that would cut out any confabulated subsequent steps?
 

vinylweatherman

You type well loads
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Location
United Kingdom
Perhaps a better way to deal with this would be to use this method. Don’t bother with spam emails, this will help avoiding clicking on links with downloadable executable files that may interact with a computers operating system at fundamental levels, possibly leading to identity theft, this being the capture of personal banking details and pass codes.

Just a thought that would cut out any confabulated subsequent steps?

This is the equivalent of sweeping the problem under the carpet. It's what the spammers expect you to do, so that they can just carry on as before. Only a tiny minority click through and play, but this is enough to keep them going. What is needed is pressure brought to bear on their paymasters so that they can't make money by spamming casinos.

Do casinos REALLY want to be lumped in with malware, Trojans, etc, or do they want to "clean up the industry" so as to appear legit in order to counter the argument from the anti online casino lobby that the industry is not much better than a scam.
 

Simmo!

Paleo Meister (means really, really old)
Joined
May 29, 2004
Location
England
I've been getting this spam too. To be honest, the name just sounds like a dodgy casino anyway.

There will always be a shedload of spam in this industry because it's lucrative. No amount of complaining, regulation and stuff will stop clipjoints from spamming people. The only way it wil stop is if people stop playing there but they know full well people are inherantly greedy and the offer of free money is too enticing for people naive to the pitfalls.

It's just something you have to live with and simply delete it. Anyone who knowingly clicks through on an unsolicited email is part of the problem.
 

Andy Walker

Full Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
UK
This is the equivalent of sweeping the problem under the carpet. It's what the spammers expect you to do, so that they can just carry on as before. Only a tiny minority click through and play, but this is enough to keep them going. What is needed is pressure brought to bear on their paymasters so that they can't make money by spamming casinos.

Do casinos REALLY want to be lumped in with malware, Trojans, etc, or do they want to "clean up the industry" so as to appear legit in order to counter the argument from the anti online casino lobby that the industry is not much better than a scam.

This really and initially wasn’t about the way affiliates operate it was about my suggestion of good computer practice; don’t risk yourself with installing something that could later cause you grief from an unknown source. This is applicable in all manner of ways that don’t involve online gaming.

But I thank you I have revaluated and now am under the illusion that certain casino sites would indeed endorse such practices, I mean ways of doctoring links or brushing the fact under the vinyl flooring that an affiliate would suggest by unsolicited email that casino x was in fact casino y.

Trust me I am a Sweater Man.
 

vinylweatherman

You type well loads
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Location
United Kingdom
I've been getting this spam too. To be honest, the name just sounds like a dodgy casino anyway.

There will always be a shedload of spam in this industry because it's lucrative. No amount of complaining, regulation and stuff will stop clipjoints from spamming people. The only way it wil stop is if people stop playing there but they know full well people are inherantly greedy and the offer of free money is too enticing for people naive to the pitfalls.

It's just something you have to live with and simply delete it. Anyone who knowingly clicks through on an unsolicited email is part of the problem.

The problem is that even accredited casinos market like this, and it seems near impossible to get them to police their affiliates. These are the casinos that should put pressure on their affiliates because by not doing so, the good casinos are making themselves hard to differentiate from the bad.

If a new player saw a site that said "Gold Club", but ended up downloading 32Red instead, it would make them think 32Red was no better that all the others that tried the same trick. The difference is that with 32Red, the affiliate responsible would find themselves without an account. Other accredited casinos seem to go easy on affiliates, perhaps saying that they made a mistake and just need a slap on the wrist.

Mostly, it is the rogues who try this trick, but occasionally the spam will be for an accredited casino here, and some is pretty convincing that it came from the casino itself.
 

Andy Walker

Full Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Location
UK
Do casinos REALLY want to be lumped in with malware, Trojans, etc, or do they want to "clean up the industry" so as to appear legit in order to counter the argument from the anti online casino lobby that the industry is not much better than a scam.

The problem is that even accredited casinos market like this, and it seems near impossible to get them to police their affiliates. These are the casinos that should put pressure on their affiliates because by not doing so, the good casinos are making themselves hard to differentiate from the bad.

This kind of says it all, I am done with this particular thread.
 

randomiam

Dormant Account
Joined
Jun 4, 2013
Location
australia
heres a email to add to the block list

Introducing the recent winners Spam
Remove star Gold Ring Club Casino <[email protected]> Tue, Sep 3, 2013 at 10:19 PM
Be careful with this message. Similar messages were used to steal people's personal information. Unless you trust the sender, don't click links or reply with personal information. Learn more
To: richar***[email protected]
Cc: me
***[email protected], deo***[email protected], dk**[email protected], mo***[email protected]
Reply | Reply to all | Forward | Print | Delete | Show original
Hi,

We have been congratulating players on some serious jackpots recently.

To continue more of these generous pay outs, Gold Ring Club casino is offering you a 200% Match bonus.

This means that on top of your deposit, the casino will add 200% onto that amount.

Use this bonus to get started on your road to incredible rewards.

Take a look below at how much and on what games our Players have recently won:

€9,403 across Beach Babes, Dolphin Tale and Immortal Romance
€18,613 on Thunderstruck II
€135,370 across Burning Desire and Tens or Better
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€25,168 across Tomb Raider and Ladies Nite
€16,000 across Chocolate Factory and Thunderstruck
€16,000 across VIP - Table - French Roulette Gold
€29,846 across The Great Galaxy Grab and The Twisted Circus
€12,025 on Double Double Bonus Poker
€10,000 on Deuces Wild

We want you to be the next player we congratulate.

Play now and claim your bonus to become the winner we’ve been waiting for.

More information is available on the website.

See you soon!

Outdated URL (Invalid)

now spamming offering microgaming games
 

Ajax

Dormant account
Joined
Aug 21, 2013
Location
London
Either you have a very secure setup or you don't really care much about safety. I've fallen for the occasional phishing link with no immediate consequences but voluntarily opening a link from spam email and downloading a client isn't very safety-concious
 

ChillBill

Banned User - Aussiedave in disguise
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Location
Australia
Introducing the recent winners Spam
Remove star Gold Ring Club Casino <[email protected]> Tue, Sep 3, 2013 at 10:19 PM

Adding spam emails to a block list is waste of time and effort.
Spammers have literally 1000's of domains, plus they usually operate botnets. Other than that, they spoof headers and use shonky (fake) emails.

The only action is to try and obtain the affiliate ID. And then hope the casino their spamming, has a zero policy to spam. You can also submit spam to places like spamcop.net and knujon.com.
 
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