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More aussie tragety

Discussion in 'The Attic' started by davey, Nov 3, 2010.

    Nov 3, 2010
  1. davey

    davey Dormant account

    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Coffs Harbour Australia
    Hey Chayton our second blockbuster - or is it too depressing?

    As a youngster on our farm at Weethalle in outback Australia in the 1960s we had no video games or television. Hang on a minute we had no electricity either!
    "How did you survive Dad?" my kids often ask, with a mixture of pity and amazement in their voices.
    "We made our own fun" I always answer, but lately I've been giving the question a bit more thought. The reason being that at lot of what happened in those days I had shifted to the side of the brain that I refuse to use.
    You see my brother Michael is two years older than me and I know for sure that he made his own fun. The trouble being that I was his "Playstation!"

    He had me test run suspect billy carts, pushbikes with no handle bars and had a huge laugh after legging me bare-back onto the old milking cow. Michael definitely wasn't bored.

    One of his favourite modes of entertainment was to have me test the rusty rabbit traps that Dad had left lying around. I wasn't the sharpest tool in the shed and he was able to convince me that what he had in mind wasn't at all dangerous.
    "Now to set the trap just put your foot on the spring and the jaws will open. You then just pull them apart with your fingers," he cunningly suggested.
    It was at the "pulling apart with my fingers" part that I started to worry as I couldn't see the clip that kept the trap open.
    "How do I set it?'', I yelled with desperation starting to take over my self control.
    I looked up to see Michael running for his life, and through the laughter I heard him say something about the clip being broken. It was a this point I decided there was only one thing left to do.
    "Mum!!!" I screamed as the jaws shut with 8 fingers jammed between them.

    Luckily Mum had become quite astute at unlocking rabbit traps and it wasn't long before I was free. A couple of days bathing in salty water and my fingers were as good as new.

    Now you would think I would have learned but it was only a year or so later that Michael showed me how to set off a rabbit trap using one's foot.
    "You just put your foot accross both jaws and release slowly and they will gently close." Sounded simple enough but I was a little concerned because I was only wearing socks.

    "Doesn't matter what you're wearing" he said. I learned about it last week in science class and its something to do with Newton's third law", he confindently assured me.
    Well I certainly couldn't argue with science and promptly set off the trap. All went according to plan for a monent at least. When the jaws were almost closed I suddenly felt excruciating pain!
    The jaws had managed to grip just a small amount of flesh on the bottom of my foot.
    Mum again came to my rescue but this time I needed stitches and a couple of days in hospital.
    "I didn't know he had flat feet", Michael insisted as the doctor was sewing up my wound.
    That excuse didn't cut it with Mum and it wasn't long after we were shuffled off to boarding school....and that's another tragic story.


    .
     
  2. Nov 3, 2010
  3. jod5413

    jod5413 Is That Better?

    Occupation:
    having a good time doing anything
    Location:
    somewhere on the planet
    Gawd, Davey!!

    That is really funny and yet it is also really sad. I was like your brother growing up with a sister that was like you. I really didn't mean to cause trouble, it just came naturally to me. :p

    It didn't help that she was the apple of Daddy's eye and I was the dog crap beneath his feet. (He never forgave me for not being a son for him and no matter how hard I tried to be a boy, or tomboy, it wasn't enough.)

    Ah, memories! :D

    Good story, Guy!! :thumbsup:
     
  4. Nov 3, 2010
  5. chayton

    chayton aka LooHoo CAG PABnonaccred webmeister

    Occupation:
    Freelance Designer
    Location:
    Edmonton Canada
    I see Colin Farrell as brother Michael - I know he's not from Oz, but still....

    I haven't spoken to my older brother for years - although he did some nasty sh*t when we were kids, it's nothing compared to what he did when he grew up so I'm not gonna tell any stories.
     
  6. Nov 3, 2010
  7. davey

    davey Dormant account

    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Coffs Harbour Australia
    Mel Gibson to play Dad

    Hey Chayton
    For the upcoming blockbuster I recon Mel Gibson has to play my Dad. My Dad was an alcoholic who had passionate affairs with Russian beauties. The only difference was the Russian beauties were only in his mind and in the girly mags he had hidden underneath his matress.
    Collin Farrel would be perfect as Michael although it might be hard to make him look 12 again. All we need now is a dopey slow talking dude (possibly extremely handsome)to play Davey!
    I'll keep working on the sript.
    Cheers
    Davey
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Nov 3, 2010
  9. davey

    davey Dormant account

    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Coffs Harbour Australia
    Now I'm tearing up!

    Hi Jodi
    Now you've got me tearing up Jodi. That's really sad about how you felt about you're Dad. That would have been the most unbearable feeling.
    Perfect families don't exist but somehow we have to make the best of the cards we're delt. (pardon the pun)
    That's one of the reasons I started writing. To get all the angst out and make a sometimes difficult upbringing kinda funny.
    Hope the next 50 years are fabulous for you.
    Cheers
    Davey
     

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