Littlewoods No Longer Accepts US Customers?

aka23

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I received an email about this change earlier today. This is disappointing, as I liked Littlewood's monthly bonus and did quite well at this casino. Nearly half of Cryptologic casinos don't allow US residents any more:

US Friendly -- Intercasino, Omni, Sands, VIP, William Hill
US Banned -- Littlewoods, Totalbet, UK Betting, Ritz Club

Useless -- Peach
 

Westland Bowl

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When are they going to get a clue that it is sports betting, not regular casino games, that are the focus of the US Justice Department actions? This point has been repeated and stressed time and time again in this forum and others. Can't they read the Wire Act themselves?
 

Casinomeister

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When are they going to get a clue that it is sports betting, not regular casino games, that are the focus of the US Justice Department actions? This point has been repeated and stressed time and time again in this forum and others. Can't they read the Wire Act themselves?
The problem is that there are some states where it is explicitly illegal to gamble online - period. Louisiana for instance. This has nothing to do with the wire act.

If you are operating an online casino that takes bets from these states, you become a target of these states, not the DoJ.
 

Simmo!

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Littlewoods are inditrectly linked to sports betting via the soccer pools, but I suspect this is more to do with profile and safety for their execs. It's clear the US is targetting high-profile organisations for publicity as much as anything. And the UK bookies are notoriously cautious when it comes to preserving their reputations. It's one of the reasons why I would always trust a casino run byone of the bookies. They know their stuff and are very careful to be seen to be clean.

Probably not a great loss to US players as they insisted on UK Pound betting anyway.

Jackpot Joy are also announcing a similar thing incidentally. I would expect William Hill to follow soon too.
 

vinylweatherman

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US

I expect they are waiting for the US Justice Department to become aware that the wire act is specific to sports betting:D

The latest arrest seems to be based on a company that USED TO accept sports betting but no longer does. I expect the executives would rather rid themselves of ALL US exposure rather than risk arrest should they inadvertantly wander into US Juristiction. For one elderly Brit, US Juristiction included SOUTH AFRICA; worse still, he was the WRONG MAN!

I doubt the US authorities worry too much, as deterring ALL internet gaming is their aim, and if they can achieve this by judicial "terrorism" ahead of the Goodlatte bill all the better. With the flurry of casinos now kicking out their US players, this approach seems to be working.

For the rest, it is a conflict between Fear and Greed, with the winner yet undecided.
 

Westland Bowl

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The problem is that there are some states where it is explicitly illegal to gamble online - period. Louisiana for instance. This has nothing to do with the wire act.

If you are operating an online casino that takes bets from these states, you become a target of these states, not the DoJ.

I thought that it was illegal for Louisiana citizens to gamble online, which would have been quite hard to enforce and prosecute. So a state law is binding on a foreign (to US) entity? Since when?

So all Louisiana has to do is open a bunch of accounts and see which ones accepts bets and charge them? What do they think they are going to get out of it? Suppose a judgement favors the state, how is that going to be enforced? Huh? Would United Nations or World Trade Organization enforce it? A whole bunch of money will be spent by the state with no chance of recuperating it. But I guess state and federal thugs don't care.
 

Casinomeister

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I thought that it was illegal for Louisiana citizens to gamble online, which would have been quite hard to enforce and prosecute. So a state law is binding on a foreign (to US) entity? Since when?

So all Louisiana has to do is open a bunch of accounts and see which ones accepts bets and charge them? What do they think they are going to get out of it? Suppose a judgement favors the state, how is that going to be enforced? Huh? Would United Nations or World Trade Organization enforce it? A whole bunch of money will be spent by the state with no chance of recuperating it. But I guess state and federal thugs don't care.
If you offer games and accept these players, my guess is that you'd be aiding and abetting. If some district attorney can convince a judge that a crime has been committed, then they can issue a warrant. If you fly into the States and they check your passport, and an outstanding warrant pops up, and the warrant involves a felony, you're pretty much screwed.
 

GrandMaster

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Louisiana Revised Statutes 14:90.3(E):

"Whoever designs, develops, manages, supervises, maintains, provides, or produces any computer services, computer system, computer network, computer software, or any server providing a Home Page, Web Site, or any other product accessing the Internet, World Wide Web, or any part thereof offering to any client for the primary purpose of the conducting as a business of any game, contest, lottery, or contrivance whereby a person risks the loss of anything of value in order to realize a profit shall be fined not more than twenty thousand dollars, or imprisoned with or without hard labor, for not more than five years, or both."
 

Westland Bowl

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Louisiana Revised Statutes 14:90.3(E):

"Whoever designs, develops, manages, supervises, maintains, provides, or produces any computer services, computer system, computer network, computer software, or any server providing a Home Page, Web Site, or any other product accessing the Internet, World Wide Web, or any part thereof offering to any client for the primary purpose of the conducting as a business of any game, contest, lottery, or contrivance whereby a person risks the loss of anything of value in order to realize a profit shall be fined not more than twenty thousand dollars, or imprisoned with or without hard labor, for not more than five years, or both."

So if the state of Virginia was to sell lottery tickets via an order page (Outdated URL (Invalid) ) to a person or sting in Louisiana, then Virginia state is liable? Should Louisiana arrest the Virginia Lotto Board? But I guess thugs don't prosecute family.
 

soflat

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So if the state of Virginia was to sell lottery tickets via an order page (Outdated URL (Invalid) ) to a person or sting in Louisiana, then Virginia state is liable? Should Louisiana arrest the Virginia Lotto Board? But I guess thugs don't prosecute family.

Can I buy lottery tickets by mail?

Yes, you can purchase Mega Millions and Win For Life Subscriptions. Subscription forms are available here or at Virginia Lottery retailers throughout the state.

Subscribers must have a Virginia mailing address. You can buy a subscription for $26 (3 months), $52 (six months) or $104 (entire year).
 

winbig

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Louisiana Revised Statutes 14:90.3(E):

"Whoever designs, develops, manages, supervises, maintains, provides, or produces any computer services, computer system, computer network, computer software, or any server providing a Home Page, Web Site, or any other product accessing the Internet, World Wide Web, or any part thereof offering to any client for the primary purpose of the conducting as a business of any game, contest, lottery, or contrivance whereby a person risks the loss of anything of value in order to realize a profit shall be fined not more than twenty thousand dollars, or imprisoned with or without hard labor, for not more than five years, or both."

How would that apply to foreign operators?

Seems to me that only applies to actual citizens of LA.

I think they're just looking for extra funding to help rebuild after Katrina. Anyone ever think of that?
 

Westland Bowl

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Can I buy lottery tickets by mail?

Yes, you can purchase Mega Millions and Win For Life Subscriptions. Subscription forms are available here or at Virginia Lottery retailers throughout the state.

Subscribers must have a Virginia mailing address. You can buy a subscription for $26 (3 months), $52 (six months) or $104 (entire year).

Thanks for the clarification, soflat. Durn! Thought I found a discrepancy.

The point is how in the world are casinos and for that matter, any website have control over who visits their website or play at their casino? What if the town of Picurnoze bans online gambling? How is the online casino in another country going to know that? How about some villiage in India?
 

GrandMaster

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Their view is that anyone who offers online gambling services available in Louisiana commits a crime. They ran sting operation with state troopers opening accounts and placing bets. Writing gambling software is also illegal under this law, so I find it odd that they decided to go after the chairman of a British company instead of RTG executives and employees based in the US.
 

soflat

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Does anyone think Intercasino will give the boot to US players?

If not, why? Are they under different regulations or is it just a matter of money?
 

jetset

RIP Brian
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The problem is that there are some states where it is explicitly illegal to gamble online - period. Louisiana for instance. This has nothing to do with the wire act.

If you are operating an online casino that takes bets from these states, you become a target of these states, not the DoJ.


This, together with Bryan's comments regarding the issue of sealed or covert warrants of arrest by individual states targeting international business people (previously the province of the federal government) pretty much sums up the situation.

The already uncertain U.S. legal scene has now become a lot more complicated and confusing, and companies are starting to take a "safe rather than sorry" approach, especially at executive travel level.

Meanwhile, the outcome of Peter Dicks's challenge on the Louisiana extradition will be watched closely by corporate lawyers everywhere, as will the BetonSports / Carruthers proceedings.

With the current banning attempts in the Senate, this has to be one of the most hectic legal periods yet experienced.
 

jetset

RIP Brian
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This does, however raise a very interesting point in this complex legal mix - does Louisiana have jurisdiction even within the USA to pursue a supplier to casinos that offer gaming in Louisiana (as per the example of RTG here, which is based in Atlanta, Georgia)?

The question of international extradition will also inevitably come up, but I suspect that is a real hot potato that will be passed to the federal authorities with some alacrity - there are already misgivings about abuse of the special anti-terrorist extradition agreement with the UK, which has so far mainly been used against anything but terrorists.
 

soflat

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Oct 3, 2005
Location
Florida
Did anyone get there money back from Littlewoods yet? They usually processed withdrawals pretty quickly, but I am locked out and nothing has hit NT yet.

Also, do you guys think all Crypto's will ban US players. They are NASDAQ listed, I don't see how we can own stock in a company doing illegal business.
 

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