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Roguish casinos & email database lists

Discussion in 'Casino Spam Complaints' started by AussieDave, Nov 12, 2008.

    Nov 12, 2008
  1. AussieDave

    AussieDave Dodgy whacko backstabber

    Occupation:
    Gaming SEO Specialist & Casino Webmaster
    Location:
    Australia
    Hi all,

    I find myself in a quandary because I've always held the belief that what is said in a PM should always stay in a PM.

    I received an email the other day from a casino affiliate manager however the email address used is an old one. Although it's associated to a domain I own, I stopped using it about 3 years ago because it made its way onto a email db list that was obviously being sold. Because I was inundated with spam.

    Anyway made contact with the rep here who said this in response to my spam complaint:

    "Are you suggesting buying email databases shouldn't occur? I'm quite sure it's one of the most widely used marketing strategies in the online market."

    Obviously someone who doesn't think spamming people is an issue.

    I did suggest that they should post their views of buying db lists to the public forums but I don't think that will happen.

    So on that note...I'd like to hear other peoples views on exactly how you feel about your email addresses being sold (without your permission) & then getting spammed?



    Cheers

    T
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Nov 12, 2008
  3. Pinababy69

    Pinababy69 RIP Lisa

    Occupation:
    Crusader
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario - Canada
    I'd love to know which affy manager sent you that Trezz, but respect the privacy part.

    How does it make me feel? Pisses me off to no end. I'd also bet that the attitude expressed above by that particular manager, is more widespread than we know. Once again, just proving that this industry is about money....and ethics play a very small part overall.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Nov 12, 2008
  5. vinylweatherman

    vinylweatherman You type well loads CAG MM

    Occupation:
    STILL At Leisure
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    It depends on whether it is sold with or without the permission of the user of the Email address. In many countries, it is ILLEGAL to sell someone's contact details without permission. A dim view is also taken of companies that trick customers into giving permission by not making the options clear to them.

    The spam problem is down to the sale of Email details to UNVETTED customers, which then results in these details ending up on many spammers list, and entering the completely unregulated market of trading information.

    Casinos make great promises about player data being secure, but THIS rep seems to indicate that the norm is completely the opposite of this, and cannot understand why anyone should be surprised it happens.

    Well I am not really, I see all the promises about how secure our information is, and know that if you directly ask a casino whether they sell our information, or even just our Email addresses, they act "offended" that we should think such a thing of them, yet here we have a rep who sees nothing wrong with this, and is just as surprised that we think that casinos do NOT sell on our Email addresses.

    The obvious conclusion is that we are being routinely lied to about the extent to which our personal information is distributed outside of the casino we give it too. Worse still, we are simply not permitted to employ some of the sensible safeguards such as refusing to give our phone numbers in some cases, even when the reason is that we do not EVER want to be called by them. We also have to give VERY DETAILED personal information (usually after cashing out, when it is a bit late to have second thoughts if we want our money), they say this is secure also, but how many players have sent this information in, only to be told to "send it again", often many times because the casino has mislaid the originals - we know not where, but this is an easy route for something far more serious than Email addresses to find it's way into the hands of criminals.

    I have THREE Email addressses, and have had these for some years now.

    I use ONE for casinos, ONE for public forums, and ONE for my own website.

    I receive spam on all three, as you would expect. MY website one is easily harvested, but receives by far the least spam. In second place is - well, you would think it would be the one I only give to casinos, as this should be secure - sadly though, SECOND place for spam goes to the one I supply on the internet, and in my profile here at CM. FIRST place, and by a long way, goes to the PRIVATE Email address I only use for casinos and personal Emails. Given that this one is the most secure of all, how come it receives such an overwhelming amount of spam.

    Casino reps tend to argue that ANY Email address, however private and secure, can be spammed simply because spammers randomly generate combinations to cover all possible addresses, and will always hit the good ones.

    It's like a random game of roulette, ALL numbers are equally available, so in the long term all should receive the ball an equal number of times. In the same sense, if spam were down to random generation of email addresses, all email addresses should receive the SPAM an equal number of times over the long term.
    For a particular number to come up in roulette far more often than the rest, the wheel (or RNG) has to be rigged. The same applies to spam, and if one Email address receives far more spam than it should by chance, it has been helped, meaning it has been SOLD/PASSED ON/COMPROMISED by someone I have given it to, and this is in addition to it being randomly generated by spambots.

    Casinos can deny this till they are blue in the face, but they will find many will not believe them.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Nov 12, 2008
  7. winbig

    winbig Keep winning this amount. webby PABnononaccred

    Occupation:
    Bum
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I don't think that's happening as much now, as it used to. I created a separate gmail account for my accounts with VPL months ago, and to this day, I've not received one piece of spam in it.

    The issue not only lies with the casino/affiliate program selling your email address, but what else comes up is where your email address goes from there.

    The person/company that buys that db of addresses incorrectly assumes that it's a clean, opt-in list, and that they can turn around and re-sell it to whomever they see fit, once they're done with it.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Nov 12, 2008
  9. AussieDave

    AussieDave Dodgy whacko backstabber

    Occupation:
    Gaming SEO Specialist & Casino Webmaster
    Location:
    Australia
    I know of some well respected branded casinos who spam or use marketing companies to do it for them. And yes they probably do buy db email lists too.

    But what got my back up was the cavalier attitude I got when I contacted the rep. He may as well of said...SO WHAT, BIG DEAL :rolleyes:

    Believe me nothing would give me greater pleasure right now than to post the entire PM and to name & shame this casino rep.

    IMHO your attitude stinks (Mr casino rep). It's people like you who give the industry a bad rap and why legit casino offers, casino comms and newsletters are winding up in spam folders, or worse not being delivered.



    Cheers

    T
     

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