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British Medical Association report on UK gambling

Discussion in 'Casino Industry Discussion' started by jetset, Jan 15, 2007.

    Jan 15, 2007
  1. jetset

    jetset Ueber Meister CAG

    Occupation:
    Senior Partner, InfoPowa News Service
    Location:
    Earth
    B.M.A. REPORT RELEASED

    Fruit machines bad for under-18s, and more money needed for problem gambler treatment

    The British Medical Association seems to have released a report originally scheduled for January 22, judging by coverage in UK newspapers and on the BBC today. In the report the Association expresses concerns about the treatment of rising numbers of problem gamblers that may be associated with the reform of UK gambling law, and the threat to players who start too young.

    Details of the research methodology backing the report are not yet available, but an academic at Nottingham Trent University is understood to be the author...and he has some fears about the advent of licensed remote gaming in Britain, too.

    The report recommends a review of slot machine access and whether such access should be restricted to players over the age of 18. The rationale for this is the greater susceptibility to becoming addicted to gambling where players are adolescent. Almost one in five young people currently play fruit machines at least once a week, the report claims.

    Research has shown that playing fruit machines is linked to truancy, stealing, getting into trouble with teachers and parents, borrowing cash or using lunch money to play the machines, poor schoolwork and aggressive behaviour, the B.M.A. says.

    A BMA spokesman said: "Tough action is required to deal with this and banning under-18s from using slot machines could be a starting point."

    The report also makes recommendations for the general gambling industry:

    Treatment for problem gambling should be provided under the National Health Service.

    Gambling operators should pay at least GBP10 million a year to the Responsibility in Gambling Trust for research, prevention and treatment programmes.

    Research is needed into the link between Internet gaming sites and problem gambling.

    Gambling operators should supply information on addiction, treatment and services to customers.

    Adolescent gambling should be taken as seriously as adult problem gambling.

    Slot machines should be reviewed to ensure they are not accessible to adolescents.

    Predictably, the politicians have taken note and are scoring points by commenting on the report. Shadow culture secretary Hugo Swire said: "The Government's reforms were supposed to tackle problem gambling and organised crime, yet in the last 24 hours, reports from both the police and doctors warn that the opposite is likely to occur.

    "It is particularly concerning that both reports warn that children are likely to be among the victims of gambling addiction.

    "It seems astonishing that Tessa Jowell (the British minister responsible for gambling reform) is prepared to ignore these concerns in her desire to make Britain a haven for gambling."

    The BMA's head of science and ethics, Dr Vivienne Nathanson, said: "Problem gambling is associated with a number of health problems and the BMA is concerned that there are insufficient treatment facilities available. Psychological problems can include anxiety, depression, guilt and suicidal thoughts. Relationships can also be affected."

    The author of the BMA report, Professor Mark Griffiths of Nottingham Trent University, said gambling online, via the internet, mobile phones or interactive television had doubled since 2001 and was a cause for concern. "Online gambling in the UK has doubled since 2001 and further research in this area should be seen as a priority," he says.

    Seven in 10 adults gamble each year, helping to sustain a GBP 9 billion industry, and BMA doctors fear that treatment services were patchy with many services not offering gambling support.

    But a Department of Health spokeswoman said services were there for gambling addicts.

    "Anybody with a gambling problem who seeks help from the NHS will be offered support and, if necessary, treatment to help them overcome their addiction.

    "Specialised addiction services have a long history of helping people with gambling problems."

    And she added officials were liaising with the Department of Culture, Media and Sport and "to ensure that efforts in this area are coordinated".

    The Gambling Act is due to come into force in September, paving the the way for new land casinos and the licensing and regulation of Internet gambling companies.

    Malcolm Bruce, director of the Responsibility in Gambling Trust, which is overwhelmingly funded by the gambling industry to fund research and services, said: "Over the last three years we have invested GBP 5 million into services and research and are planning to increase that in the future."
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Jan 15, 2007
  3. lots0

    lots0 Banned User - troll posts - flaming PABnonaccred

    Occupation:
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    You know I love it when the propaganda machine gets going.

    Statements like, “Research has shown ...” and then make some far out claim, but never offer the research data, are nothing but propaganda aimed at the slow witted. (I personally like the phrase "Research has PROVEN" backed by the research data...)


    “Research is needed into the link between Internet gaming sites and problem gambling.”

    Translateing this statement from the article... We NEED to be able to show Internet Gambling is a problem so we can make our point that any gambling is against god and will get you sent to hell...
     
  4. Jan 15, 2007
  5. jetset

    jetset Ueber Meister CAG

    Occupation:
    Senior Partner, InfoPowa News Service
    Location:
    Earth
    That was the first thing that grabbed my eye when we read this report initially, and I agree with you that it is ludicrous that the mainstream media latch on to these apparently unsubstantiated claims without ever questioning the methodology of the research, the size of the samples or the seeming pauncity of fact to back up the claims of those concerned.

    Hopefully the author of the report, an academic called Professor Mark Griffiths, will disclose these important details at some stage.

    Many of these so-called surveys have a sample size of hundreds rather than thousands (the one on Brits gambling at work is a case in point, and the much mainstream publicised Stanford report on Internet addiction only mustered a sample of around 2 500)

    It seems that as long as it is anti-gambling it's good to go.

    If there are verified bona fide problems then I'm all for exposing and addressing them, but I would like to see some substance behind claims.

    The other thing that struck me here was the speed with which rival politicians are trying to score points.
     
  6. Jan 15, 2007
  7. lots0

    lots0 Banned User - troll posts - flaming PABnonaccred

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    Absolutely!

    IMO, it is becoming more and more difficult to find the real problems that problem gambling or gambling addiction causes and address them, because of all bogus and illogical claims made by the anti gambling faction.
     
  8. Jan 15, 2007
  9. GrandMaster

    GrandMaster Ueber Meister CAG

    Occupation:
    Mathematician by day, online gambler by night.
    Location:
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    Mark Griffiths or the BMA are unlikely to be against gambling on religious grounds, but they might see studying the effects of the new gambling law as a useful source of funds.
     
  10. Jan 15, 2007
  11. jetset

    jetset Ueber Meister CAG

    Occupation:
    Senior Partner, InfoPowa News Service
    Location:
    Earth
    Very true, and that crossed my mind reading some of the comments in the original reports.
     
  12. Jan 15, 2007
  13. lots0

    lots0 Banned User - troll posts - flaming PABnonaccred

    Occupation:
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    I agree that bringing god into it was a little over the line. :oops:

    My only defense is that here in the US the anti-gambling faction that I deal with on a regular basis are for the most part a group of radical religious nut jobs. I just assumed that the anti gambling forces in the UK were the same.

    (Oh and by the way... I am looking for any passage in the King James version of the Bible that says gambling is a sin...)
     

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