ATTN: Casino Rep Be careful what you wish for question.

P.V.

Dormant Account
webmeister
Joined
Apr 17, 2010
Location
Turn around...
It's been stated many times lately "be careful what you wish for", mostly towards U.S. players supporting U.S. regulation with regards to online poker, casino games etc.. You might be right. :what:

Following this industry I can see why players want more regulation whether it means being taxed on their winnings etc.. I personally would rather be taxed, with heavy regulation than not paid at all with the need to fight for my winnings. JMO

I do understand fraud, this isn't my point. Fraud stinks, should be dealt with.

I agree there's many good operations operating currently, like 32 Red but look at the ones everyone thought was good and then suddenly went sour. I won't expand, but who knows without hard core regulation? Again JMO.

It's not just casino's, e-wallets too. Talk about a double edge sword for the industry..

Kudos's to CM & Max for their continued efforts but doesn't this industry needs further direction to stop pages like this? https://www.casinomeister.com/static/pitchabitch/index.php

So my question is what do you wish for in 2012 with online gaming, moving forward, not just U.S. players but everyone?

Instead of being careful what you wish for, what do you wish for in the gaming industry and why?

This is an intelligent, focused group and the replies will enumerate some interesting data I'm sure. :)
 

jetset

RIP Brian
Joined
Feb 22, 2001
Location
Earth
I think that again we need to retain a sense of perspective. We tend to see the nasty side of operational issues where players complain about casinos (often with justification, sometimes less so and sometimes with ulterior motives.) So when we look at Max's PAB stats we need to remember that the other side of the coin is the vast number of online gambling transactions that are successfully concluded day in and day out by reputable online operators and players who have repeatedly used their facilities.

Now, my wish list would be the expulsion from the industry of outfits that are rogue in nature and conduct - we see good examples here all the time. Quite how that can be accomplished is beyond me, but outing them is a good start, alerting players and hopefully discouraging said players from risking their hard earned bucks with thieves and villains, and thus reducing the chances of survival of the aforementioned thieves and villains.

Then, in the European context I would like to see less national self-interest in the continuing implementation of regulations and instead a harmonised, practical and fair system of regulation overseen by a more aggressive European Commission. One that has sensible regulation that still permits healthy competition between safe and fair companies, offering the player a wider choice, and a uniform set of requirements that applies to all EU member countries and obviates confusion and excessive legal costs.

That might be accompanied by a truly independent industry ombudsman, providing players with a single channel of effective communication to use when negotiations with a regulated casino break down. Not a channel like the LGA which is too slow and unresponsive (if it responds at all) and similar pseudo-regulators.

In the United States it would be good to see fair and sensible regulation with the protection and entertainment of players as the priority rather than tax dollars and corporate expansion. Something that is not overly US-protectionist, giving players a wide choice of competitive products, and removing the present climate of uncertainty and grey areas.

I would like to see less onerous service charges from greedy e-processors, too.

In general I think the industry has not done too badly in terms of keeping up with new technology and maintaining a flow of games of all genres, and I hope that is maintained.

Finally I would like to see more of the very constructive conversations we have seen lately on this forum, conducted with courtesy and without the necessity to flame or defame.
 

rockycatt

meistercatt
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Location
Boston
ok i think im realistic when i say this , all i want is the usa to legalize it then leave it a lone and let a more honest government license it and police it [ ya i know it doesn't sound stars and stripes ] but the greed of the usa government right now well there only going to do it fro the money and not for player protection oh ya they will create all kinds of jobs and fill them with there cronies

there must be a old how about Canada takes the reins or another country that isn't loaded with career politicians

now im not thankful for what i got in living my life in the states its just that at this time what makes the DOJ or there other revenue offices think that there the only ones that can do the job


can some one else here recommend a honest host country to do this job i think they already blew the Internet thing just my 0.02 cents
respectfully RC
 

jetset

RIP Brian
Joined
Feb 22, 2001
Location
Earth
Here's another one - the hope that online gambling marketers act more professionally regarding player privacy, spamming and honoring requests to opt out/unsubscribe.
 

maxd

PAB (Complaints) Manager
Staff member
Joined
Jan 20, 2004
Location
Saltirelandia
... doesn't this industry needs further direction to stop pages like this? https://www.casinomeister.com/static/pitchabitch/index.php

:confused: "Stop" the PAB stuff? Why would you want that?

Until there is universal licensing and effective policing of online casinos -- and I anticipate that to arrive around the time hell freezes over and the devil skates to work -- players will need someone to help them with their issues. How is that something that needs to be "stopped"?

Sorry, I'm guessing I missed the point you were trying to make. Can you elaborate?
 

nisosbar

Ueber Meister
PABnonaccred
Joined
Aug 28, 2009
Location
Right here
New softwares and games, faster withdrawals, looser slots, video poker and blackjack that deal randomly from a 52-card deck as if it were a real game in a casino. A handful of casinos now do this. I would just like MORE casinos to do this. :D

I don't think internet legalization will occur, nationwide, within five years, and probably not even ten. Individual states, such as Nevada or NJ, may find ways to carve out legal exceptions for within-state online gaming. But for most people, it's not ever going to happen, IMHO. (Unfortunately.)
 

chayton

aka LooHoo
webmeister
PABnonaccred
CAG
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Location
Edmonton Canada
I think the OP meant "stop the NEED for PABs" (giving Max more time to just hang out or sharpen his knives) :)

My wish list is simple

1. I wish software providers would step up and take responsibility for the casinos that run their software. Casino groups like Virtual and a bunch of the scummy Playtechs should have had their licenses revoked years ago. I know it's all about money, but there should be SOME ethics involved.

2. A central database for player docs, or barring that, something that's better than sending your stuff via email.

3. A nice big win for me would be great!

Thanks Santa!
 

P.V.

Dormant Account
webmeister
Joined
Apr 17, 2010
Location
Turn around...
:confused: "Stop" the PAB stuff? Why would you want that?

Until there is universal licensing and effective policing of online casinos -- and I anticipate that to arrive around the time hell freezes over and the devil skates to work -- players will need someone to help them with their issues. How is that something that needs to be "stopped"?

Sorry, I'm guessing I missed the point you were trying to make. Can you elaborate?


I didn't mean for you to stop PAB's, I simply meant with regulation there will most definitely be other venues for disputes.

If Nevada get's online gaming then disputes can be filed with the Nevada Gaming Authority.

I commend what you do for players, hope that clarifies. :)
 

cheetahwind

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2009
Location
Iowa
I would agree generally with the greedy e-processor statement, but have you seen the bank fees these days for doing "business" within the US. Hell it costs anywhere from $10 up to $30 to get that international wire transfer. Then you pay anywhere from a $0.10 to $0.30 per transaction you process regardless just because the banks tax the hell out of every transaction a business makes. Lets not forgot the monthly fees that they occur. Then to process outgoing wires or ACH's costs money too (Anywhere from $1/transaction up to $20 varying on the bank or processor). If you think about in the end the e-processor makes very, very little money. Granted I'm sure make hundreds of transactions a day. To make up something decent, but the risks they take are astronomical. Hell I would agree the fee, considering what i just mentioned. I probably would be greedy and ask for $50 per transfer to just cover my over head and also to also make a nice cushion of when a government comes cracking down on me.
 

jetset

RIP Brian
Joined
Feb 22, 2001
Location
Earth
I wish software providers would step up and take responsibility for the casinos that run their software. Casino groups like Virtual and a bunch of the scummy Playtechs should have had their licenses revoked years ago. I know it's all about money, but there should be SOME ethics involved.

I would put that on my wish list, too! But I'm reminding myself as I write this that this is a wish list;)

@cheetahwind

Banks are greedy everywhere and look where it has taken us, yet they show little sign of changing their ways voluntarily. I still think e-processors overcharge - I was hit for $70 recently on an incoming Paypal payment, for example - how do they justify that on a simple electronic transfer of funds - and the USA was not even involved:mad:
 

takethemoney

Banned User - Chargebacks at Slotastic
Joined
Apr 14, 2004
Location
Washington
The ideal situation for me would be an e-wallet that issued a debit card and a lightning fast paying casino, where I could get my money almost instantly from any ATM.
I used to have this, at least pretty close with Paypal, when they allowed casino business.
 

P.V.

Dormant Account
webmeister
Joined
Apr 17, 2010
Location
Turn around...
I wish for the NGA to break down the term "service provider" within their proposed regulations.

It seems a bit extortionate for any company providing outside services to help licensed poker site's along with players, of course if regulated, to endure a $50,000 and up to $70,000 investigation fee. On top of the $2,000 application fee.

I ask them if ISP's, email providers, phone companies would need to pay the fees as well since they have a database too.

The reply was hire a gaming attorney in Nevada! :confused:
 

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