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An Unusual Angle on Playng the Derby

Discussion in 'Sports Talk' started by Scorp, Apr 12, 2013.

    Apr 12, 2013
  1. Scorp

    Scorp Dormant account

    Occupation:
    retired
    Location:
    Montana
    Over at Bitbets, I came across a couple of Derby propositions, one for a horse "Orb", the other for a horse, "Revolutionary".

    The prop reads:"Orb, the horse, will win first place in the 2013 Kentucky Derby" , the other prop is identical except for the horse-name.

    You can bet for, or against either or both props. Both props (these are parimutuel betting structures ... you are betting against other people and the house takes a very small percentage) are about even money.

    : "Even money to LOSE on two separate horses???" I thought. "How can I lose?" and impulsively entered "No" bets on both. It smells like easy money this far out. Even post time favorites often find ways to lose. This far out, a good number end up not running at all... they go lame, or they don't make it to the fiinal pick, etc.

    BUT... now I am also thinking... if I were following a derby contender that I was pretty hot about... that would be a great way to get a decent price on a horse that might go to post, afterall, at short to very short odds.

    I'm probably not seeing all the potential angles with this.

    Thoughts?
     

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