A few things that I learned on CM

Balthazar

The Governor
Joined
Aug 14, 2012
Location
Woodbury
-I learned that software providers (at the very least MG) collect a "tax" on casino bonuses offered by casino operators.
-I learned that operators do not own the gaming servers; all casinos depend on the same central servers operated by the software providers.
-I learned that software providers decide players from which countries will be accepted by the operators.
-I learned that operators must pay a % of their revenue to the software provider.

So basically, they are just operating "skins" and they are all working for the software providers. Operators are getting a cut for handling payments and support, so they are not "real entities", they are only some kind of affiliates. They have little to no power over the product offered. They can only promote it.

So when a game is caught cheating, we can blame the "skin operator" for offering the game, but the real rogue party has to be the provider.
 

incrediblestuff

SearchingForTheHolyGrail!
webmeister
CAG
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Location
Mostly the Netherlands
To say the least, your information is not complete, not all casinos work like that.Your assumptions are wrong as such.
This is something that lies within the range of possibilities. All businesses that operate on an international scale, especially with a mixed palette of products are holding each other liable, and demand a some warranty to ensure their product is being used as intended, legally and practically, in all the possible jurisdictions, which is always underlined in contractual terms, of which you are only displaying a few possible examples, but out of context because the lack of oversight from the complete agreement.
There are businesses based on franchise, and there are stand alone casinos, with custom software, i would refrain from such bold statement.

It's a but of a pot stirrer if you ask me..
If you are just looking for some confirmation i think you presented it in the wrong way ;)
 

Balthazar

The Governor
Joined
Aug 14, 2012
Location
Woodbury
If you are just looking for some confirmation i think you presented it in the wrong way ;)

I do not look for confirmation and there's no assumption. All these were confirmed here at one time or another by casino reps. I didn't start a "things that I learned" thread and then threw some wild guesses in there, if that's what you're implying.
 

bigjohn

Dormant account
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Northeast Coastal USA
It seems some of the larger operations actually purchase the software code and then run it how they see fit. I believe that is the main difference between some of the Rival Brands where you have a big group that are rouge-ish and one or two that are better. That is also probably why when all the Rivals were pulled from the US market the independent ones could stay if they wanted. This is mostly conjecture but I know for a fact that Bovada have purchased the RTG software code and have modified it. Not sure if MG allows their software code to be sold, probably not or I'm sure there would be at least one operating in the US market.
 

chuchu59

gambling addict
PABnonaccred
CAG
PABinit
Joined
Sep 26, 2004
Location
SOMEWHERE IN ASIA
-I learned that software providers (at the very least MG) collect a "tax" on casino bonuses offered by casino operators.
-I learned that operators do not own the gaming servers; all casinos depend on the same central servers operated by the software providers.
-I learned that software providers decide players from which countries will be accepted by the operators.
-I learned that operators must pay a % of their revenue to the software provider.

So basically, they are just operating "skins" and they are all working for the software providers. Operators are getting a cut for handling payments and support, so they are not "real entities", they are only some kind of affiliates. They have little to no power over the product offered. They can only promote it.

So when a game is caught cheating, we can blame the "skin operator" for offering the game, but the real rogue party has to be the provider.

Not necessarily true eg for Microgaming.
 

incrediblestuff

SearchingForTheHolyGrail!
webmeister
CAG
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Location
Mostly the Netherlands
-I learned that some software providers (at the very least MG) can collect a "tax" on casino bonuses offered by casino operators.
-I learned that some operators do not own the gaming servers; those Casinos mostly depend on the same central servers operated by the software providers.
-I learned that software providers have a say as to which countries will be accepted by the operators.,but this is a concept in motion, and changes, depending on alterations in respective countries laws
-I learned that some operators must pay a % of their revenue to the software provider.


I edited your post slightly to be more factual.
The last statement i won't even touch.
 

muha20

Dormant account
Joined
Jun 8, 2012
Location
slovenija
tnx for this some new thing i know now :)
-I learned that software providers (at the very least MG) collect a "tax" on casino bonuses offered by casino operators.
-I learned that operators do not own the gaming servers; all casinos depend on the same central servers operated by the software providers.
-I learned that software providers decide players from which countries will be accepted by the operators.
-I learned that operators must pay a % of their revenue to the software provider.

So basically, they are just operating "skins" and they are all working for the software providers. Operators are getting a cut for handling payments and support, so they are not "real entities", they are only some kind of affiliates. They have little to no power over the product offered. They can only promote it.

So when a game is caught cheating, we can blame the "skin operator" for offering the game, but the real rogue party has to be the provider.
 

maxd

PAB (Complaints) Manager
Staff member
Joined
Jan 20, 2004
Location
Saltirelandia
No offense Balthazar but your statements are so generalized that they are only partially meaningful. Some software providers do have the kind of relationship with their operators that you describe, MANY do not.

For instance many casinos are run on servers controlled by their licencing body, not the provider. Many others run software that they've purchased and tweaked. Etc.

I would caution readers to NOT take Balthazar's overly generalized speculations as fact. There is some truth in there, yes, but it's a much bigger, broader, and more diverse industry than these personal observations take into account.
 
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